Vegetation studies in the Humansdorp region of the Fynbos Biome

dc.contributor.advisorMoll, Eugeneen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorCowling, Richard Men_ZA
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-19T11:27:51Z
dc.date.available2014-11-19T11:27:51Z
dc.date.issued1982en_ZA
dc.descriptionBibliography: leaves 111-127.en_ZA
dc.description.abstractThis thesis comprises five papers dealing with syntaxonomy, history, species diversity and growth form distribution in Cape shrublands and non-Cape vegetation types (subtropical thicket, Afromontane forest) in the Humansdorp region of the Fynbos Biome. The first paper is a re-evaluation of vegetation concepts in the study area and, more generally, in the Fynbos Biome and adjacent biomes. Syntaxa are characterized in terms of floristics (including biogeographical affinities and patterns of endemism), structure and dynamics. In the second paper both descriptive and historical approaches are used to generate hypotheses to explain vegetation history during the last glacial to Holocene sequence. The third paper investigates, and seeks explanations for, diversity relations in the vegetation types of the study area. Both historical and ecological factors are used to predict patterns of species diversity. In the fourth paper patterns in the relative importance of structural attributes and growth forms along fynbos and non-fynbos coenoclines are studied. An appendix paper focusses on the distribution of C₃ and C₄ grasses in the Cape shrublands of the study area. It was concluded that descriptive studies such as this have much value in clarifying vegetation concepts and generating hypotheses to explain variations in community structure. However, as management and conservation are the major aims of the Fynbos Biome Project, future studies should concentrate on the reproductive biology and regeneration niches of plants in the fire-prone Cape shrublands. From the results of such studies a predictive knowledge of Cape shrubland dynamics will emerge - the key to judicious management.en_ZA
dc.identifier.apacitationCowling, R. M. (1982). <i>Vegetation studies in the Humansdorp region of the Fynbos Biome</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9733en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitationCowling, Richard M. <i>"Vegetation studies in the Humansdorp region of the Fynbos Biome."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 1982. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9733en_ZA
dc.identifier.citationCowling, R. 1982. Vegetation studies in the Humansdorp region of the Fynbos Biome. University of Cape Town.en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Cowling, Richard M AB - This thesis comprises five papers dealing with syntaxonomy, history, species diversity and growth form distribution in Cape shrublands and non-Cape vegetation types (subtropical thicket, Afromontane forest) in the Humansdorp region of the Fynbos Biome. The first paper is a re-evaluation of vegetation concepts in the study area and, more generally, in the Fynbos Biome and adjacent biomes. Syntaxa are characterized in terms of floristics (including biogeographical affinities and patterns of endemism), structure and dynamics. In the second paper both descriptive and historical approaches are used to generate hypotheses to explain vegetation history during the last glacial to Holocene sequence. The third paper investigates, and seeks explanations for, diversity relations in the vegetation types of the study area. Both historical and ecological factors are used to predict patterns of species diversity. In the fourth paper patterns in the relative importance of structural attributes and growth forms along fynbos and non-fynbos coenoclines are studied. An appendix paper focusses on the distribution of C₃ and C₄ grasses in the Cape shrublands of the study area. It was concluded that descriptive studies such as this have much value in clarifying vegetation concepts and generating hypotheses to explain variations in community structure. However, as management and conservation are the major aims of the Fynbos Biome Project, future studies should concentrate on the reproductive biology and regeneration niches of plants in the fire-prone Cape shrublands. From the results of such studies a predictive knowledge of Cape shrubland dynamics will emerge - the key to judicious management. DA - 1982 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1982 T1 - Vegetation studies in the Humansdorp region of the Fynbos Biome TI - Vegetation studies in the Humansdorp region of the Fynbos Biome UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9733 ER - en_ZA
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11427/9733
dc.identifier.vancouvercitationCowling RM. Vegetation studies in the Humansdorp region of the Fynbos Biome. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 1982 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9733en_ZA
dc.language.isoengen_ZA
dc.publisher.departmentDepartment of Biological Sciencesen_ZA
dc.publisher.facultyFaculty of Scienceen_ZA
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Cape Town
dc.subject.otherBotanyen_ZA
dc.titleVegetation studies in the Humansdorp region of the Fynbos Biomeen_ZA
dc.typeDoctoral Thesis
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoral
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen_ZA
uct.type.filetypeText
uct.type.filetypeImage
uct.type.publicationResearchen_ZA
uct.type.resourceThesisen_ZA
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