Fertility, birth intervals, and their proximate determinants in Zimbabwe

Master Thesis

2009

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University of Cape Town

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Abstract
It is found that birth intervals have increased from about 28 months in the 1960s to about 51 months by the year 2000, with the greater part of this increase occuring after 1985. Fertility fell from birth intervals are congruent with each other, in terms of timing and tempo. Of the two main proximate determinants identified; marital status and contraceptive use, the latter is founf to be the more dominant force behind changes in birth spacing. Differentials by marital status are not significant. The research adds to a growing body of studies on the nature of fertility tansitions in sub-Sahara Africa, and would particularly be useful in explaining observed differences in fertility transitions between countries in the region.
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Includes bibliographical references (leaves 70-72).

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