Molecular phylogenetics and the evolution of high-frequency echolocation in horseshoe bats (Genus Rhinolophus)

dc.contributor.advisorJacobs, David Sen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorStoffberg, Samanthaen_ZA
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-13T14:13:35Z
dc.date.available2014-08-13T14:13:35Z
dc.date.issued2007en_ZA
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaves 184-210).en_ZA
dc.description.abstractHorseshoe bats (genus Rhinolophus) belong to the Old World family Rhinolophidae. They are high-duty cycle bats and many species use echolocation calls dominated by high frequencies (above 60 kHz). Much is known about how they use their echolocation calls, but very little is known about why these bats use echolocation calls of such high frequencies, or what has caused the divergence in echolocation call frequency between rhinolophid species. I test five hypotheses that may explain the evolution and divergence of high frequencies in the horseshoe bats: (1) The Allotonic Frequency Hypothesis - echolocation frequencies outside of moth hearing range (allotonic frequencies) have evolved in response to moth hearing; (2) The Allometry Hypothesis - highfrequency echolocation calls are simply a function of body size; (3) The Acoustic Adaptation Hypothesis - selection pressures linked to habitat structure have shaped the evolution of high-frequency echolocation calls; (4) The Foraging Habitat Hypothesis - foraging style and habitat of a bat should correspond to echolocation call frequency and wing design; and (5) The Acoustic Communication Hypothesis - echolocation frequencies evolved under selection pressure which eliminated overlap among sympatric species of rhinolophids, within the context of effective communication.en_ZA
dc.identifier.apacitationStoffberg, S. (2007). <i>Molecular phylogenetics and the evolution of high-frequency echolocation in horseshoe bats (Genus Rhinolophus)</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6211en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitationStoffberg, Samantha. <i>"Molecular phylogenetics and the evolution of high-frequency echolocation in horseshoe bats (Genus Rhinolophus)."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 2007. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6211en_ZA
dc.identifier.citationStoffberg, S. 2007. Molecular phylogenetics and the evolution of high-frequency echolocation in horseshoe bats (Genus Rhinolophus). University of Cape Town.en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Stoffberg, Samantha AB - Horseshoe bats (genus Rhinolophus) belong to the Old World family Rhinolophidae. They are high-duty cycle bats and many species use echolocation calls dominated by high frequencies (above 60 kHz). Much is known about how they use their echolocation calls, but very little is known about why these bats use echolocation calls of such high frequencies, or what has caused the divergence in echolocation call frequency between rhinolophid species. I test five hypotheses that may explain the evolution and divergence of high frequencies in the horseshoe bats: (1) The Allotonic Frequency Hypothesis - echolocation frequencies outside of moth hearing range (allotonic frequencies) have evolved in response to moth hearing; (2) The Allometry Hypothesis - highfrequency echolocation calls are simply a function of body size; (3) The Acoustic Adaptation Hypothesis - selection pressures linked to habitat structure have shaped the evolution of high-frequency echolocation calls; (4) The Foraging Habitat Hypothesis - foraging style and habitat of a bat should correspond to echolocation call frequency and wing design; and (5) The Acoustic Communication Hypothesis - echolocation frequencies evolved under selection pressure which eliminated overlap among sympatric species of rhinolophids, within the context of effective communication. DA - 2007 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2007 T1 - Molecular phylogenetics and the evolution of high-frequency echolocation in horseshoe bats (Genus Rhinolophus) TI - Molecular phylogenetics and the evolution of high-frequency echolocation in horseshoe bats (Genus Rhinolophus) UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6211 ER - en_ZA
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11427/6211
dc.identifier.vancouvercitationStoffberg S. Molecular phylogenetics and the evolution of high-frequency echolocation in horseshoe bats (Genus Rhinolophus). [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 2007 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6211en_ZA
dc.language.isoengen_ZA
dc.publisher.departmentDepartment of Biological Sciencesen_ZA
dc.publisher.facultyFaculty of Scienceen_ZA
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Cape Town
dc.subject.otherZoologyen_ZA
dc.titleMolecular phylogenetics and the evolution of high-frequency echolocation in horseshoe bats (Genus Rhinolophus)en_ZA
dc.typeDoctoral Thesis
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoral
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen_ZA
uct.type.filetypeText
uct.type.filetypeImage
uct.type.publicationResearchen_ZA
uct.type.resourceThesisen_ZA
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