A compact short-wave receiving antenna for use in high-noise areas

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Guelke, R en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Besseling, L en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Muggleton, Louis Miles en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-10-25T13:34:32Z
dc.date.available 2016-10-25T13:34:32Z
dc.date.issued 1960 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Muggleton, L. 1960. A compact short-wave receiving antenna for use in high-noise areas. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22296
dc.description.abstract An antenna has been developed with a signal-to-noise performance that is better than that of a typical Rhombic antenna during local thunder storms. Although the design is of general application to the reception, in high-noise areas, of long distance transmissions, this work deals in particular with the London-Salisbury circuit, at September noon, 1956, on 21.47 Mc/s. A basis of theoretical comparison between the performances of different antennas has been proposed. It relies on the technique of replacing a thunder storm by an "equivalent radio transmitter" set up on the frequency to which the receiver is tuned and for which the antenna is designed. A V.H.F. scale model has been used to produce an optimum design for the proposed antenna which is an end-fire array of parasitic elements. The polar diagrams and signal-to-noise performance of the proposed design are derived for several different types of earth mat. The method used for these derivations is substantiated by correlation with practical sampling measurements. A specification for the final configuration is given and its applicability is indicated by applying the design to the problem of improving the expected performance on the London-Salisbury transmissions from September to December, 1960. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Electrical Engineering en_ZA
dc.title A compact short-wave receiving antenna for use in high-noise areas en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment
dc.publisher.department Department of Electrical Engineering en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Muggleton, L. M. (1960). <i>A compact short-wave receiving antenna for use in high-noise areas</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Electrical Engineering. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22296 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Muggleton, Louis Miles. <i>"A compact short-wave receiving antenna for use in high-noise areas."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Electrical Engineering, 1960. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22296 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Muggleton LM. A compact short-wave receiving antenna for use in high-noise areas. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Electrical Engineering, 1960 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22296 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Muggleton, Louis Miles AB - An antenna has been developed with a signal-to-noise performance that is better than that of a typical Rhombic antenna during local thunder storms. Although the design is of general application to the reception, in high-noise areas, of long distance transmissions, this work deals in particular with the London-Salisbury circuit, at September noon, 1956, on 21.47 Mc/s. A basis of theoretical comparison between the performances of different antennas has been proposed. It relies on the technique of replacing a thunder storm by an "equivalent radio transmitter" set up on the frequency to which the receiver is tuned and for which the antenna is designed. A V.H.F. scale model has been used to produce an optimum design for the proposed antenna which is an end-fire array of parasitic elements. The polar diagrams and signal-to-noise performance of the proposed design are derived for several different types of earth mat. The method used for these derivations is substantiated by correlation with practical sampling measurements. A specification for the final configuration is given and its applicability is indicated by applying the design to the problem of improving the expected performance on the London-Salisbury transmissions from September to December, 1960. DA - 1960 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1960 T1 - A compact short-wave receiving antenna for use in high-noise areas TI - A compact short-wave receiving antenna for use in high-noise areas UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22296 ER - en_ZA


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