Fas and FasL gene polymorphisms are not associated with cervical cancer but differ among Black and Mixed-ancestry South Africans

dc.contributor.authorChatterjee, Koushiken_ZA
dc.contributor.authorEngelmark, Malinen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorGyllensten, Ulfen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorDandara, Colleten_ZA
dc.contributor.authorMerwe, Lizeen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorGalal, Ushmaen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorHoffman, Margareten_ZA
dc.contributor.authorWilliamson, Anna-Liseen_ZA
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-30T09:25:53Z
dc.date.available2015-10-30T09:25:53Z
dc.date.issued2009en_ZA
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND:Cervical cancer is one of the most important cancers in African women. Polymorphisms in the Fas (FasR) and Fas ligand (FasL) genes have been reported to be associated with cervical cancer in certain populations. This study investigated whether these polymorphisms are associated with cervical cancer or human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in South African women.FINDINGS:Participants were 447 women with invasive cervical cancer (106 black African and 341 women of mixed-ancestry) and 424 healthy women controls, matched by age, (101 black African and 323 women of mixed-ancestry) and domicile (rural or urban). Two polymorphisms in Fas gene (FasR-1377G/A, FasR-670A/G) and one in FasL gene (FasL844T/C) were genotyped by TaqMan. None of the polymorphisms, or the Fas haplotypes, showed a significant association with cervical cancer. There was also no association with HPV infection in the control group. However, on analysis of the control group, highly significant allele, genotype and haplotype differences were found between the two ethnic groups. There were generally low frequencies of FasR-1377A alleles, FasR-670A alleles and FasL-844C alleles in black women compared to the women of mixed-ancestry. CONCLUSION: This is the first study on the role of Fas and FasL polymorphisms in cervical cancer in African populations. Our results suggest that these SNPs are not associated with cervical cancer in these populations. The allele frequencies of the three SNPs differed markedly between the indigenous African black and mixed-ancestry populations.en_ZA
dc.identifier.apacitationChatterjee, K., Engelmark, M., Gyllensten, U., Dandara, C., Merwe, L., Galal, U., ... Williamson, A. (2009). Fas and FasL gene polymorphisms are not associated with cervical cancer but differ among Black and Mixed-ancestry South Africans. <i>BMC Research Notes</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14493en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitationChatterjee, Koushik, Malin Engelmark, Ulf Gyllensten, Collet Dandara, Lize Merwe, Ushma Galal, Margaret Hoffman, and Anna-Lise Williamson "Fas and FasL gene polymorphisms are not associated with cervical cancer but differ among Black and Mixed-ancestry South Africans." <i>BMC Research Notes</i> (2009) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14493en_ZA
dc.identifier.citationChatterjee, K., Engelmark, M., Gyllensten, U., Dandara, C., van der Merwe, L., Galal, U., ... & Williamson, A. L. (2009). Fas and FasL gene polymorphisms are not associated with cervical cancer but differ among Black and Mixed-ancestry South Africans. BMC research notes, 2(1), 238.en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Chatterjee, Koushik AU - Engelmark, Malin AU - Gyllensten, Ulf AU - Dandara, Collet AU - Merwe, Lize AU - Galal, Ushma AU - Hoffman, Margaret AU - Williamson, Anna-Lise AB - BACKGROUND:Cervical cancer is one of the most important cancers in African women. Polymorphisms in the Fas (FasR) and Fas ligand (FasL) genes have been reported to be associated with cervical cancer in certain populations. This study investigated whether these polymorphisms are associated with cervical cancer or human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in South African women.FINDINGS:Participants were 447 women with invasive cervical cancer (106 black African and 341 women of mixed-ancestry) and 424 healthy women controls, matched by age, (101 black African and 323 women of mixed-ancestry) and domicile (rural or urban). Two polymorphisms in Fas gene (FasR-1377G/A, FasR-670A/G) and one in FasL gene (FasL844T/C) were genotyped by TaqMan. None of the polymorphisms, or the Fas haplotypes, showed a significant association with cervical cancer. There was also no association with HPV infection in the control group. However, on analysis of the control group, highly significant allele, genotype and haplotype differences were found between the two ethnic groups. There were generally low frequencies of FasR-1377A alleles, FasR-670A alleles and FasL-844C alleles in black women compared to the women of mixed-ancestry. CONCLUSION: This is the first study on the role of Fas and FasL polymorphisms in cervical cancer in African populations. Our results suggest that these SNPs are not associated with cervical cancer in these populations. The allele frequencies of the three SNPs differed markedly between the indigenous African black and mixed-ancestry populations. DA - 2009 DB - OpenUCT DO - 10.1186/1756-0500-2-238 DP - University of Cape Town J1 - BMC Research Notes LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2009 T1 - Fas and FasL gene polymorphisms are not associated with cervical cancer but differ among Black and Mixed-ancestry South Africans TI - Fas and FasL gene polymorphisms are not associated with cervical cancer but differ among Black and Mixed-ancestry South Africans UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14493 ER - en_ZA
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11427/14493
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1756-0500-2-238
dc.identifier.vancouvercitationChatterjee K, Engelmark M, Gyllensten U, Dandara C, Merwe L, Galal U, et al. Fas and FasL gene polymorphisms are not associated with cervical cancer but differ among Black and Mixed-ancestry South Africans. BMC Research Notes. 2009; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14493.en_ZA
dc.language.isoengen_ZA
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltden_ZA
dc.publisher.departmentDivision of Virologyen_ZA
dc.publisher.facultyFaculty of Health Sciencesen_ZA
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Cape Town
dc.rightsThis is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Licenseen_ZA
dc.rights.holder2009 Williamson et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.en_ZA
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0en_ZA
dc.sourceBMC Research Notesen_ZA
dc.source.urihttp://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcresnotes/en_ZA
dc.subject.otherCervical canceren_ZA
dc.subject.otherHuman Papillomavirusen_ZA
dc.subject.otherGene Polymorphismen_ZA
dc.titleFas and FasL gene polymorphisms are not associated with cervical cancer but differ among Black and Mixed-ancestry South Africansen_ZA
dc.typeJournal Articleen_ZA
uct.type.filetypeText
uct.type.filetypeImage
uct.type.publicationResearchen_ZA
uct.type.resourceArticleen_ZA
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