Percutaneous Puncture of Flexor Sheath Ganglions: An Assessment of Recurrence

dc.contributor.advisorHudson, Donald
dc.contributor.advisorSolomons, Michael
dc.contributor.advisorMcGuire, Duncan
dc.contributor.authorNajjaar, Azzaam
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-23T09:29:23Z
dc.date.available2021-02-23T09:29:23Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.date.updated2021-02-23T07:53:02Z
dc.description.abstractBackground Flexor tendon sheath ganglions (FTSG) comprise up to 15% of hand ganglions. The management is split between two schools of practice: percutaneous puncture or surgical excision. The literature is equivocal as to which holds true superiority in terms of recurrence rates. The cost of surgical excision is higher and the recovery is longer. In addition, surgery also brings with it the potential for surgical complications, both immediate and long term. Percutaneous puncture can be performed at the time of the initial consult and an immediate return to normal activity with no down-time for the patient. The aim of this study is to assess the recurrence rate after percutaneous puncture. We also describe our employed technique. Method The technique for percutaneous puncture involved the use of a 25-gauge needle for ganglion puncture, no sclerosant or corticosteroid was injected, and an immediate post-procedure mobilisation protocol was employed. Patients were identified from clinical records and were followed up at a minimum of six months to check for recurrence. Results Eighteen patients were included in the study, 12 females and 6 males. The majority of FTSG were found to occur in the middle finger. Two patients experienced a recurrence. Both were successfully treated with a repeat puncture. No patients experienced a complication. Conclusion In our study, we show a low recurrence rate obtained with percutaneous puncture of FTSG using a simple technique. No complications were noted in our cohort on follow-up. We, therefore, recommend employing it as a first line treatment in the management of FTSG.
dc.identifier.apacitationNajjaar, A. (2020). <i>Percutaneous Puncture of Flexor Sheath Ganglions: An Assessment of Recurrence</i>. (). ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/32930en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitationNajjaar, Azzaam. <i>"Percutaneous Puncture of Flexor Sheath Ganglions: An Assessment of Recurrence."</i> ., ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/32930en_ZA
dc.identifier.citationNajjaar, A. 2020. Percutaneous Puncture of Flexor Sheath Ganglions: An Assessment of Recurrence. . ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/32930en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Master Thesis AU - Najjaar, Azzaam AB - Background Flexor tendon sheath ganglions (FTSG) comprise up to 15% of hand ganglions. The management is split between two schools of practice: percutaneous puncture or surgical excision. The literature is equivocal as to which holds true superiority in terms of recurrence rates. The cost of surgical excision is higher and the recovery is longer. In addition, surgery also brings with it the potential for surgical complications, both immediate and long term. Percutaneous puncture can be performed at the time of the initial consult and an immediate return to normal activity with no down-time for the patient. The aim of this study is to assess the recurrence rate after percutaneous puncture. We also describe our employed technique. Method The technique for percutaneous puncture involved the use of a 25-gauge needle for ganglion puncture, no sclerosant or corticosteroid was injected, and an immediate post-procedure mobilisation protocol was employed. Patients were identified from clinical records and were followed up at a minimum of six months to check for recurrence. Results Eighteen patients were included in the study, 12 females and 6 males. The majority of FTSG were found to occur in the middle finger. Two patients experienced a recurrence. Both were successfully treated with a repeat puncture. No patients experienced a complication. Conclusion In our study, we show a low recurrence rate obtained with percutaneous puncture of FTSG using a simple technique. No complications were noted in our cohort on follow-up. We, therefore, recommend employing it as a first line treatment in the management of FTSG. DA - 2020_ DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town KW - Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PY - 2020 T1 - Percutaneous Puncture of Flexor Sheath Ganglions: An Assessment of Recurrence TI - Percutaneous Puncture of Flexor Sheath Ganglions: An Assessment of Recurrence UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/32930 ER - en_ZA
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11427/32930
dc.identifier.vancouvercitationNajjaar A. Percutaneous Puncture of Flexor Sheath Ganglions: An Assessment of Recurrence. []. ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 2020 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/32930en_ZA
dc.language.rfc3066eng
dc.publisher.departmentDivision of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
dc.publisher.facultyFaculty of Health Sciences
dc.subjectPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
dc.titlePercutaneous Puncture of Flexor Sheath Ganglions: An Assessment of Recurrence
dc.typeMaster Thesis
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters
dc.type.qualificationlevelMMed
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