Men and ARVs: how does being a man affect access to antiretroviral therapy in South Africa? an investigation among Xhosa-Speaking men in Khayelitsha

dc.contributor.authorBeck, Daniel
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-25T11:12:42Z
dc.date.available2016-04-25T11:12:42Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.date.updated2016-04-25T11:11:07Z
dc.description.abstractThis paper aims to improve understanding of the nature and causes of barriers to accessing ARV treatment that affect men and result in their low rates of clinic attendance. The findings are intended to provide a direction for policy in the implementation of the South African government’s Comprehensive Plan for HIV/AIDS. Through a combination of semi-structured interviews and focus groups, experiences and opinions were collected from men living with HIV/AIDS and health workers working at an ARV treatment clinic in Khayelitsha, South Africa. Using an interpretivist approach, and informed by theories of social constructionism, an understanding was formed taking into consideration the complex nature of their realities. Thematic content analysis was selected as the best way of handling a large volume of material spanning a broad range of issues. Only by attempting to understand the nature of Xhosa culture and what it means to be a Xhosa man, was it possible to comprehend the material. Barriers to access manifested themselves at several levels of experience. Stigma, gender issues, preference of traditional medicine, cultural ideals of manhood, and several practical issues, all influenced a man’s ability to acknowledge his HIV status or to seek help. Suggestions to address these problems were made throughout the paper, founded on a combination of interviewees’ opinions and researcher’s analysis. These suggestions are important to acknowledge before a national ARV programme becomes fully implementational.en_ZA
dc.identifier.apacitationBeck, D. (2004). <i>Men and ARVs: how does being a man affect access to antiretroviral therapy in South Africa? an investigation among Xhosa-Speaking men in Khayelitsha</i> University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Centre for Social Science Research(CSSR). Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19194en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitationBeck, Daniel <i>Men and ARVs: how does being a man affect access to antiretroviral therapy in South Africa? an investigation among Xhosa-Speaking men in Khayelitsha.</i> University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Centre for Social Science Research(CSSR), 2004. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19194en_ZA
dc.identifier.citationBeck, D. (2004). Men and ARVs: How Does Being a Man Affect Access to Antiretroviral Therapy in South Africa? an Investigation Among Xhosa-speaking Men in Khayelitsha. Centre for Social Science Research, University of Cape Town.en_ZA
dc.identifier.isbn1-77011-011-9en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Working Paper AU - Beck, Daniel AB - This paper aims to improve understanding of the nature and causes of barriers to accessing ARV treatment that affect men and result in their low rates of clinic attendance. The findings are intended to provide a direction for policy in the implementation of the South African government’s Comprehensive Plan for HIV/AIDS. Through a combination of semi-structured interviews and focus groups, experiences and opinions were collected from men living with HIV/AIDS and health workers working at an ARV treatment clinic in Khayelitsha, South Africa. Using an interpretivist approach, and informed by theories of social constructionism, an understanding was formed taking into consideration the complex nature of their realities. Thematic content analysis was selected as the best way of handling a large volume of material spanning a broad range of issues. Only by attempting to understand the nature of Xhosa culture and what it means to be a Xhosa man, was it possible to comprehend the material. Barriers to access manifested themselves at several levels of experience. Stigma, gender issues, preference of traditional medicine, cultural ideals of manhood, and several practical issues, all influenced a man’s ability to acknowledge his HIV status or to seek help. Suggestions to address these problems were made throughout the paper, founded on a combination of interviewees’ opinions and researcher’s analysis. These suggestions are important to acknowledge before a national ARV programme becomes fully implementational. DA - 2004 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - Centre for Social Science Research LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2004 SM - 1-77011-011-9 T1 - Men and ARVs: how does being a man affect access to antiretroviral therapy in South Africa? an investigation among Xhosa-Speaking men in Khayelitsha TI - Men and ARVs: how does being a man affect access to antiretroviral therapy in South Africa? an investigation among Xhosa-Speaking men in Khayelitsha UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19194 ER - en_ZA
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11427/19194
dc.identifier.vancouvercitationBeck D. Men and ARVs: how does being a man affect access to antiretroviral therapy in South Africa? an investigation among Xhosa-Speaking men in Khayelitsha. 2004 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19194en_ZA
dc.languageengen_ZA
dc.publisher.departmentCentre for Social Science Research(CSSR)en_ZA
dc.publisher.facultyFaculty of Humanitiesen_ZA
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Cape Town
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.sourceCentre for Social Science Research
dc.source.urihttp://www.cssr.uct.ac.za/
dc.subject.otherMen
dc.subject.otherAntiretroviral therapy
dc.subject.otherXhosa-Speaking men
dc.titleMen and ARVs: how does being a man affect access to antiretroviral therapy in South Africa? an investigation among Xhosa-Speaking men in Khayelitshaen_ZA
dc.typeWorking Paperen_ZA
uct.type.filetypeText
uct.type.publicationResearchen_ZA
uct.type.resourceResearch paperen_ZA
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