Intervention development of a brief messaging intervention for a randomised controlled trial to improve diabetes treatment adherence in sub-Saharan Africa

dc.contributor.authorLeon, Natalie
dc.contributor.authorNamadingo, Hazel
dc.contributor.authorBobrow, Kirsty
dc.contributor.authorCooper, Sara
dc.contributor.authorCrampin, Amelia
dc.contributor.authorPauly, Bruno
dc.contributor.authorLevitt, Naomi
dc.contributor.authorFarmer, Andrew
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-11T08:49:16Z
dc.date.available2021-10-11T08:49:16Z
dc.date.issued2021-01-15
dc.date.updated2021-01-17T04:08:31Z
dc.description.abstractBackground Brief messaging interventions, including Short Message Service (SMS) text-messages, delivered via mobile device platforms, show promise to support and improve treatment adherence. To understand how these interventions work, and to facilitate transparency, we need clear descriptions of the intervention development process. Method We describe and reflect on the process of designing and pretesting an evidence- and theory-informed brief messaging intervention, to improve diabetes treatment adherence in sub-Saharan Africa. We followed the stepwise approach recommended by the Medical Research Council, United Kingdom (MRC UK) Framework for Development and Evaluation of Complex Health Interventions and guidance for mobile health intervention development. Results We used a four-phase, iterative approach that first generated primary and secondary evidence on the lived experience of diabetes, diabetes treatment services and mobile-phone use. Second, we designed a type 2 diabetes-specific, brief text-message library, building on our previous hypertension text-message library, as well as drawing on the primary and secondary data from phase one, and on expert opinion. We then mapped the brief text-messages onto behaviour change (COM-B) theoretical constructs. Third, we refined and finalised the newly developed brief text-message library through stakeholder consultation and translated it into three local languages. Finally, we piloted the intervention by pre-testing the automated delivery of the brief text-messages in the trial sites in Malawi and South Africa. The final SMS text Adherence suppoRt for people with type 2 diabetes (StAR2D) intervention was tested in a randomised controlled trial in Malawi and South Africa (trial registration: ISRCTN70768808 ). Conclusion The complexity of public health interventions requires that we give more attention to intervention development work. Our documentation and reflection on the StAR2D intervention development process promotes transparency, replicability, assessment of intervention quality, and comparison with other studies.en_US
dc.identifier.apacitationLeon, N., Namadingo, H., Bobrow, K., Cooper, S., Crampin, A., Pauly, B., ... Farmer, A. (2021). Intervention development of a brief messaging intervention for a randomised controlled trial to improve diabetes treatment adherence in sub-Saharan Africa. <i>BMC Public Health</i>, 21(Article number: 147), http://hdl.handle.net/11427/35144en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitationLeon, Natalie, Hazel Namadingo, Kirsty Bobrow, Sara Cooper, Amelia Crampin, Bruno Pauly, Naomi Levitt, and Andrew Farmer "Intervention development of a brief messaging intervention for a randomised controlled trial to improve diabetes treatment adherence in sub-Saharan Africa." <i>BMC Public Health</i> 21, Article number: 147. (2021) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/35144en_ZA
dc.identifier.citationLeon, N., Namadingo, H., Bobrow, K., Cooper, S., Crampin, A., Pauly, B., Levitt, N. & Farmer, A. et al. 2021. Intervention development of a brief messaging intervention for a randomised controlled trial to improve diabetes treatment adherence in sub-Saharan Africa. <i>BMC Public Health.</i> 21(Article number: 147) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/35144en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Leon, Natalie AU - Namadingo, Hazel AU - Bobrow, Kirsty AU - Cooper, Sara AU - Crampin, Amelia AU - Pauly, Bruno AU - Levitt, Naomi AU - Farmer, Andrew AB - Background Brief messaging interventions, including Short Message Service (SMS) text-messages, delivered via mobile device platforms, show promise to support and improve treatment adherence. To understand how these interventions work, and to facilitate transparency, we need clear descriptions of the intervention development process. Method We describe and reflect on the process of designing and pretesting an evidence- and theory-informed brief messaging intervention, to improve diabetes treatment adherence in sub-Saharan Africa. We followed the stepwise approach recommended by the Medical Research Council, United Kingdom (MRC UK) Framework for Development and Evaluation of Complex Health Interventions and guidance for mobile health intervention development. Results We used a four-phase, iterative approach that first generated primary and secondary evidence on the lived experience of diabetes, diabetes treatment services and mobile-phone use. Second, we designed a type 2 diabetes-specific, brief text-message library, building on our previous hypertension text-message library, as well as drawing on the primary and secondary data from phase one, and on expert opinion. We then mapped the brief text-messages onto behaviour change (COM-B) theoretical constructs. Third, we refined and finalised the newly developed brief text-message library through stakeholder consultation and translated it into three local languages. Finally, we piloted the intervention by pre-testing the automated delivery of the brief text-messages in the trial sites in Malawi and South Africa. The final SMS text Adherence suppoRt for people with type 2 diabetes (StAR2D) intervention was tested in a randomised controlled trial in Malawi and South Africa (trial registration: ISRCTN70768808 ). Conclusion The complexity of public health interventions requires that we give more attention to intervention development work. Our documentation and reflection on the StAR2D intervention development process promotes transparency, replicability, assessment of intervention quality, and comparison with other studies. DA - 2021-01-15 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town IS - Article number: 147 J1 - BMC Public Health KW - Mobile health (mHealth) KW - Formative intervention development KW - Brief SMS text-messaging KW - Behaviour change theory KW - Treatment adherence KW - Type 2 diabetes KW - Qualitative research KW - Sub-Saharan Africa LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PY - 2021 T1 - Intervention development of a brief messaging intervention for a randomised controlled trial to improve diabetes treatment adherence in sub-Saharan Africa TI - Intervention development of a brief messaging intervention for a randomised controlled trial to improve diabetes treatment adherence in sub-Saharan Africa UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/35144 ER - en_ZA
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-020-10089-6
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11427/35144
dc.identifier.vancouvercitationLeon N, Namadingo H, Bobrow K, Cooper S, Crampin A, Pauly B, et al. Intervention development of a brief messaging intervention for a randomised controlled trial to improve diabetes treatment adherence in sub-Saharan Africa. BMC Public Health. 2021;21(Article number: 147) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/35144.en_ZA
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.publisher.facultyFaculty of Health Sciencesen_US
dc.rights.holderThe Author(s)
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.sourceBMC Public Healthen_US
dc.source.journalissueArticle number: 147en_US
dc.source.journalvolume21en_US
dc.source.urihttps://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/
dc.subjectMobile health (mHealth)en_US
dc.subjectFormative intervention developmenten_US
dc.subjectBrief SMS text-messagingen_US
dc.subjectBehaviour change theoryen_US
dc.subjectTreatment adherenceen_US
dc.subjectType 2 diabetesen_US
dc.subjectQualitative researchen_US
dc.subjectSub-Saharan Africaen_US
dc.titleIntervention development of a brief messaging intervention for a randomised controlled trial to improve diabetes treatment adherence in sub-Saharan Africaen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
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