Assessing access barriers to Tuberculosis (TB) and Antiretroviral (ARV) treatment in Mitchell's Plain, Cape Town South Africa

dc.contributor.advisorCleary, Susanen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorMweemba, Chrispinen_ZA
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-10T12:53:51Z
dc.date.available2015-03-10T12:53:51Z
dc.date.issued2011en_ZA
dc.description.abstractAccess to health care is a very important concept which has equally important implications to the health status of individuals. However, there have been a lot of debates among researchers and policy makers on what constitutes access, and how it can be made less conceptual and more operational. The concept of access has continued to receive increased attention because of a growing realisation of its importance in health policy. Furthermore, provision of services alone without understanding barriers individuals face in accessing services could result in less optimal outcomes. It is therefore necessary to have an understanding of what "access" entails and factors that influence it if we are to have a real chance of improving access to health services and therefore enhance health. In this thesis access is viewed as consisting of three (3) interrelated and measurable dimensions (availability, affordability and acceptability). These access dimensions are related to both the system and user characteristics. Access is therefore said to have been achieved when all the three dimensions have been satisfied. Using the above definition of access, the main focus of this thesis is on access barriers (in relation to the three access dimensions) to both Tuberculosis (TB) and Antiretroviral Treatment (ART) services in Mitchell's Plain, Cape Town South Africa. Secondary cross-sectional data was used for this purpose. Access to TB and HIV treatment has been given priority because the two diseases have had a massive and negative impact on public health in the country. In addition, patients using these services may face similar barriers to care. Findings of this thesis are expected to provide insights into the barriers TB and HIV patients face in seeking care vis-a-vis availability, affordability and acceptability of services. Findings will therefore prove valuable in as far as improving access is concerned.en_ZA
dc.identifier.apacitationMweemba, C. (2011). <i>Assessing access barriers to Tuberculosis (TB) and Antiretroviral (ARV) treatment in Mitchell's Plain, Cape Town South Africa</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Health Economics Unit. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12589en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitationMweemba, Chrispin. <i>"Assessing access barriers to Tuberculosis (TB) and Antiretroviral (ARV) treatment in Mitchell's Plain, Cape Town South Africa."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Health Economics Unit, 2011. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12589en_ZA
dc.identifier.citationMweemba, C. 2011. Assessing access barriers to Tuberculosis (TB) and Antiretroviral (ARV) treatment in Mitchell's Plain, Cape Town South Africa. University of Cape Town.en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Mweemba, Chrispin AB - Access to health care is a very important concept which has equally important implications to the health status of individuals. However, there have been a lot of debates among researchers and policy makers on what constitutes access, and how it can be made less conceptual and more operational. The concept of access has continued to receive increased attention because of a growing realisation of its importance in health policy. Furthermore, provision of services alone without understanding barriers individuals face in accessing services could result in less optimal outcomes. It is therefore necessary to have an understanding of what "access" entails and factors that influence it if we are to have a real chance of improving access to health services and therefore enhance health. In this thesis access is viewed as consisting of three (3) interrelated and measurable dimensions (availability, affordability and acceptability). These access dimensions are related to both the system and user characteristics. Access is therefore said to have been achieved when all the three dimensions have been satisfied. Using the above definition of access, the main focus of this thesis is on access barriers (in relation to the three access dimensions) to both Tuberculosis (TB) and Antiretroviral Treatment (ART) services in Mitchell's Plain, Cape Town South Africa. Secondary cross-sectional data was used for this purpose. Access to TB and HIV treatment has been given priority because the two diseases have had a massive and negative impact on public health in the country. In addition, patients using these services may face similar barriers to care. Findings of this thesis are expected to provide insights into the barriers TB and HIV patients face in seeking care vis-a-vis availability, affordability and acceptability of services. Findings will therefore prove valuable in as far as improving access is concerned. DA - 2011 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2011 T1 - Assessing access barriers to Tuberculosis (TB) and Antiretroviral (ARV) treatment in Mitchell's Plain, Cape Town South Africa TI - Assessing access barriers to Tuberculosis (TB) and Antiretroviral (ARV) treatment in Mitchell's Plain, Cape Town South Africa UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12589 ER - en_ZA
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11427/12589
dc.identifier.vancouvercitationMweemba C. Assessing access barriers to Tuberculosis (TB) and Antiretroviral (ARV) treatment in Mitchell's Plain, Cape Town South Africa. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Health Economics Unit, 2011 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12589en_ZA
dc.language.isoengen_ZA
dc.publisher.departmentHealth Economics Uniten_ZA
dc.publisher.facultyFaculty of Health Sciencesen_ZA
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Cape Town
dc.subject.otherPublic Healthen_ZA
dc.titleAssessing access barriers to Tuberculosis (TB) and Antiretroviral (ARV) treatment in Mitchell's Plain, Cape Town South Africaen_ZA
dc.typeMaster Thesis
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters
dc.type.qualificationnameMPHen_ZA
uct.type.filetypeText
uct.type.filetypeImage
uct.type.publicationResearchen_ZA
uct.type.resourceThesisen_ZA
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