An analysis of the relationship between psychosocial safety climate and the work-school-interface for non-traditional students in South Africa

dc.contributor.advisorGoodman, Suki
dc.contributor.authorApril, Kelly
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-17T07:40:08Z
dc.date.available2022-01-17T07:40:08Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.date.updated2022-01-12T07:30:42Z
dc.description.abstractThe growth of a country's economy is highly dependent on the levels of skills available in that country. South Africa has a stark shortage of skilled individuals due to an inadequate and failing education system (Horwitz, 2013). As a response to this problem the South African government actively incentivises organisations to develop the skillset of their employees in order to build a strong economy, improve job creation and promote social development (Department of Higher Education and Training, 2019). It is therefore important that all stakeholders involved yield a return on this investment. It is also a global phenomenon that an increasing number of fulltime employees are also engaging in formal further studies due to the rapid changes in the labour market. For example, advancements in technology have had a major impact on traditional business models and the roles, and skills needed. These employees are referred to as non-traditional students and are the subject of this study. Research shows that trying to manage both work and school simultaneously can cause psychological strain for non-traditional students (Adebayo et al., 2008). The psychosocial safety climate (PSC) is an emerging construct which refers to the shared perceptions regarding policies, practices and procedures designed to protect the psychological health of employees (Dollard et al., 2012). This study builds on existing research in the work - school interface by investigating its application within the South African context. Participants in this research (n=127), comprised of non-traditional students (n=40) and employees who are not engaged in further studies (n=87). Correlation analysis demonstrated that PSC had a positive relationship with work school facilitation (WSF) and a negative relationship with work school conflict (WSC). It was further confirmed that job control (JC) mediated the relationship between PSC and WSF and that PSC mediated the relationship between JC and WSF. These findings show that PSC is an antecedent to the work school interface in that it promotes the positive outcomes of studying while working (work school facilitation). It further demonstrates that PSC also reduces the negative outcomes (work school conflict). This study confirmed that the working environment plays a crucial role in the work school interface and introduces PSC as a construct South African organisations should be concerned with and make a priority, based on the resources it provides employees, more especially their non-traditional students. This study's findings will add to the existing body of research and provide practical insights for enhancing the PSC application within South African organisations who have non-traditional students.
dc.identifier.apacitationApril, K. (2021). <i>An analysis of the relationship between psychosocial safety climate and the work-school-interface for non-traditional students in South Africa</i>. (). ,Faculty of Commerce ,Organisational Psychology. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/35483en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitationApril, Kelly. <i>"An analysis of the relationship between psychosocial safety climate and the work-school-interface for non-traditional students in South Africa."</i> ., ,Faculty of Commerce ,Organisational Psychology, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/35483en_ZA
dc.identifier.citationApril, K. 2021. An analysis of the relationship between psychosocial safety climate and the work-school-interface for non-traditional students in South Africa. . ,Faculty of Commerce ,Organisational Psychology. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/35483en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Master Thesis AU - April, Kelly AB - The growth of a country's economy is highly dependent on the levels of skills available in that country. South Africa has a stark shortage of skilled individuals due to an inadequate and failing education system (Horwitz, 2013). As a response to this problem the South African government actively incentivises organisations to develop the skillset of their employees in order to build a strong economy, improve job creation and promote social development (Department of Higher Education and Training, 2019). It is therefore important that all stakeholders involved yield a return on this investment. It is also a global phenomenon that an increasing number of fulltime employees are also engaging in formal further studies due to the rapid changes in the labour market. For example, advancements in technology have had a major impact on traditional business models and the roles, and skills needed. These employees are referred to as non-traditional students and are the subject of this study. Research shows that trying to manage both work and school simultaneously can cause psychological strain for non-traditional students (Adebayo et al., 2008). The psychosocial safety climate (PSC) is an emerging construct which refers to the shared perceptions regarding policies, practices and procedures designed to protect the psychological health of employees (Dollard et al., 2012). This study builds on existing research in the work - school interface by investigating its application within the South African context. Participants in this research (n=127), comprised of non-traditional students (n=40) and employees who are not engaged in further studies (n=87). Correlation analysis demonstrated that PSC had a positive relationship with work school facilitation (WSF) and a negative relationship with work school conflict (WSC). It was further confirmed that job control (JC) mediated the relationship between PSC and WSF and that PSC mediated the relationship between JC and WSF. These findings show that PSC is an antecedent to the work school interface in that it promotes the positive outcomes of studying while working (work school facilitation). It further demonstrates that PSC also reduces the negative outcomes (work school conflict). This study confirmed that the working environment plays a crucial role in the work school interface and introduces PSC as a construct South African organisations should be concerned with and make a priority, based on the resources it provides employees, more especially their non-traditional students. This study's findings will add to the existing body of research and provide practical insights for enhancing the PSC application within South African organisations who have non-traditional students. DA - 2021_ DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town KW - Non-traditional students KW - Psychosocial Safety Climate KW - Work School Conflict KW - Work School Facilitation KW - Job Control KW - Psychological Job Demands KW - Resilience KW - PSC 12 KW - BRS (Brief Resilience Scale) KW - JCQ (Job Content Questionnaire) KW - ERIQ (Effort Reward Imbalance Questionnaire) LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PY - 2021 T1 - An analysis of the relationship between psychosocial safety climate and the work-school-interface for non-traditional students in South Africa TI - An analysis of the relationship between psychosocial safety climate and the work-school-interface for non-traditional students in South Africa UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/35483 ER - en_ZA
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11427/35483
dc.identifier.vancouvercitationApril K. An analysis of the relationship between psychosocial safety climate and the work-school-interface for non-traditional students in South Africa. []. ,Faculty of Commerce ,Organisational Psychology, 2021 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/35483en_ZA
dc.language.rfc3066eng
dc.publisher.departmentOrganisational Psychology
dc.publisher.facultyFaculty of Commerce
dc.subjectNon-traditional students
dc.subjectPsychosocial Safety Climate
dc.subjectWork School Conflict
dc.subjectWork School Facilitation
dc.subjectJob Control
dc.subjectPsychological Job Demands
dc.subjectResilience
dc.subjectPSC 12
dc.subjectBRS (Brief Resilience Scale)
dc.subjectJCQ (Job Content Questionnaire)
dc.subjectERIQ (Effort Reward Imbalance Questionnaire)
dc.titleAn analysis of the relationship between psychosocial safety climate and the work-school-interface for non-traditional students in South Africa
dc.typeMaster Thesis
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters
dc.type.qualificationlevelMPhil
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