Estimate of size and interaction of the South African anchovy and pilchard populations

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Field, John G en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Newman , G G en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Centurier-Harris, Oliver Michael en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-03-17T07:18:09Z
dc.date.available 2016-03-17T07:18:09Z
dc.date.issued 1977 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Centurier-Harris, O. 1977. Estimate of size and interaction of the South African anchovy and pilchard populations. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17897
dc.description Bibliography: pages 85-87. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract The size of the South African anchovy and pilchard population was estimated using Virtual Population Analysis (Gulland 1965). These estimates were used to test classical stock recruit models as well as to investigate possible stock interactions. The population biomass of the pilchard indicated a severe decline after 1959 from a level of approximately 2 000 000 metric tons to about 200 000 metric tons in the mid 1970's. This change was in agreement with catch per unit effort estimates of abundance (Newman et al in press). The anchovy abundance remained fairly constant at about 300 000 metric tons during the period 1965 - 1974 for which estimates could be made. During 1976 the pilchard stock showed a partial recovery of its former abundance. Adult and recruit stocks of both anchovy and pilchard were fitted to the Ricker (1954) and Beverton and Holt (1957) stock/recruit curves, but there was insufficient data to allow a decision to be made as to which model was appropriate for either stock. The anchovy and pilchard populations or age groups within them do not appear to interact in a very definite manner. Attempts to quantify interactions using Virtual Population Analysis have not been successful although better estimates of the strength of age-groups would be possible if the variation in natural mortality with age was understood. The fact that elements of the stock of anchovy and pilchard do not appear to be rigorously related indicates the importance of understanding which environmental factors are critical to survival. A difference between the area in which recruitment takes place and the area in which most adults are caught indicates a movement of young fish onto the west coast fishing grounds. The movements were substantiated by observations of catch per unit effort of juveniles on the west coast in each month of the fishing season. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Zoology en_ZA
dc.title Estimate of size and interaction of the South African anchovy and pilchard populations en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Biological Sciences en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MSc en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Centurier-Harris, O. M. (1977). <i>Estimate of size and interaction of the South African anchovy and pilchard populations</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17897 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Centurier-Harris, Oliver Michael. <i>"Estimate of size and interaction of the South African anchovy and pilchard populations."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 1977. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17897 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Centurier-Harris OM. Estimate of size and interaction of the South African anchovy and pilchard populations. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 1977 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17897 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Centurier-Harris, Oliver Michael AB - The size of the South African anchovy and pilchard population was estimated using Virtual Population Analysis (Gulland 1965). These estimates were used to test classical stock recruit models as well as to investigate possible stock interactions. The population biomass of the pilchard indicated a severe decline after 1959 from a level of approximately 2 000 000 metric tons to about 200 000 metric tons in the mid 1970's. This change was in agreement with catch per unit effort estimates of abundance (Newman et al in press). The anchovy abundance remained fairly constant at about 300 000 metric tons during the period 1965 - 1974 for which estimates could be made. During 1976 the pilchard stock showed a partial recovery of its former abundance. Adult and recruit stocks of both anchovy and pilchard were fitted to the Ricker (1954) and Beverton and Holt (1957) stock/recruit curves, but there was insufficient data to allow a decision to be made as to which model was appropriate for either stock. The anchovy and pilchard populations or age groups within them do not appear to interact in a very definite manner. Attempts to quantify interactions using Virtual Population Analysis have not been successful although better estimates of the strength of age-groups would be possible if the variation in natural mortality with age was understood. The fact that elements of the stock of anchovy and pilchard do not appear to be rigorously related indicates the importance of understanding which environmental factors are critical to survival. A difference between the area in which recruitment takes place and the area in which most adults are caught indicates a movement of young fish onto the west coast fishing grounds. The movements were substantiated by observations of catch per unit effort of juveniles on the west coast in each month of the fishing season. DA - 1977 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1977 T1 - Estimate of size and interaction of the South African anchovy and pilchard populations TI - Estimate of size and interaction of the South African anchovy and pilchard populations UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17897 ER - en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record