Two societies: duality contradictions and integration: a progress report on South Africa

 

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dc.contributor.author Nassimbeni, Mary en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Underwood, Peter G en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-11-29T17:43:11Z
dc.date.available 2014-11-29T17:43:11Z
dc.date.issued 2007 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Nassimbeni, M., Underwood, P. 2007. Two societies: duality contradictions and integration: a progress report on South Africa. International Information and Library Review. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 1057-2317 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9864
dc.description This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in International Information and Library Review on 2 December 2013, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/10572317.2007.10762744. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract This paper examines the extent to which the South African Library and Information Science (LIS) agenda maps to the national agenda for the reconstruction and development of the country, which is geared to the elimination of poverty and inequality. The nation has been described as comprising two societies: the one modern and well developed, the other characterised by masses of people living in dire poverty. The mandate of LIS in South Africa includes supporting and stimulating the technological and information development of all communities and providing effective LIS education to meet this goal. The government has embraced the concept of the Information Society, emphasising the link between economic growth and Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) and has pointed to the need for information literacy education. We present a critique of the fit between LIS policies and practices (including the curriculum) and the needs of an emerging democracy and its development goals, challenged by the duality of globalisation and marginalisation. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.publisher Taylor & Francis en_ZA
dc.source International Information and Library Review en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/10572317.2007.10762744 en_ZA
dc.title Two societies: duality contradictions and integration: a progress report on South Africa en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Postprint en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Centre for Higher Education Development en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Centre for Information Literacy en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Nassimbeni, M., & Underwood, P. G. (2007). Two societies: duality contradictions and integration: a progress report on South Africa. <i>International Information and Library Review</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9864 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Nassimbeni, Mary, and Peter G Underwood "Two societies: duality contradictions and integration: a progress report on South Africa." <i>International Information and Library Review</i> (2007) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9864 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Nassimbeni M, Underwood PG. Two societies: duality contradictions and integration: a progress report on South Africa. International Information and Library Review. 2007; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9864. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Nassimbeni, Mary AU - Underwood, Peter G AB - This paper examines the extent to which the South African Library and Information Science (LIS) agenda maps to the national agenda for the reconstruction and development of the country, which is geared to the elimination of poverty and inequality. The nation has been described as comprising two societies: the one modern and well developed, the other characterised by masses of people living in dire poverty. The mandate of LIS in South Africa includes supporting and stimulating the technological and information development of all communities and providing effective LIS education to meet this goal. The government has embraced the concept of the Information Society, emphasising the link between economic growth and Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) and has pointed to the need for information literacy education. We present a critique of the fit between LIS policies and practices (including the curriculum) and the needs of an emerging democracy and its development goals, challenged by the duality of globalisation and marginalisation. DA - 2007 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - International Information and Library Review LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2007 SM - 1057-2317 T1 - Two societies: duality contradictions and integration: a progress report on South Africa TI - Two societies: duality contradictions and integration: a progress report on South Africa UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9864 ER - en_ZA


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