Accountability autonomy and authenticity: assessing the development waltz conducted to a 'kwaito' beat in Southern Africa

 

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dc.contributor.author Abrahams, Mark A en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-11-29T17:36:55Z
dc.date.available 2014-11-29T17:36:55Z
dc.date.issued 2008 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Abrahams, M. 2008. Accountability autonomy and authenticity: assessing the development waltz conducted to a 'kwaito' beat in Southern Africa. Development in Practice. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 0961-4524 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9841
dc.description This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Development in Practice on 21 January 2008, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/09614520701778348. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract For the purposes of accountability and uniformity, and as a way of giving insight into their intellectual capital regarding development practices, NGOs in Southern Africa are required by donor agencies to describe their intended activities in very clear, unambiguous terms. These requirements may include the expression of theoretical approaches, the development of logical frameworks, clear objectives, indicators for success, criteria for sustainable development, and relationships to government policies. However, the interface between reality and these planning measures and tools, most often completed without the input and contributions of the communities whom they are to serve/service, produces a much more messy, dynamic, and involved picture of the development process. None the less, the NGOs are still required to be accountable on the basis of their original proposal and planning. The author presents examples of this phenomenon and discusses the challenges facing an evaluator when dealing with competing principles of accountability, autonomy, and authenticity. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.publisher Taylor & Francis en_ZA
dc.source Development in Practice en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/09614520701778348 en_ZA
dc.subject conflict and reconstruction en_ZA
dc.subject aid en_ZA
dc.subject civil society en_ZA
dc.subject Sub-Saharan Africa en_ZA
dc.title Accountability autonomy and authenticity: assessing the development waltz conducted to a 'kwaito' beat in Southern Africa en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Postprint en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Centre for Higher Education Development en_ZA
dc.publisher.department The Centre for Open Learning (COL) en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Abrahams, M. A. (2008). Accountability autonomy and authenticity: assessing the development waltz conducted to a 'kwaito' beat in Southern Africa. <i>Development in Practice</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9841 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Abrahams, Mark A "Accountability autonomy and authenticity: assessing the development waltz conducted to a 'kwaito' beat in Southern Africa." <i>Development in Practice</i> (2008) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9841 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Abrahams MA. Accountability autonomy and authenticity: assessing the development waltz conducted to a 'kwaito' beat in Southern Africa. Development in Practice. 2008; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9841. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Abrahams, Mark A AB - For the purposes of accountability and uniformity, and as a way of giving insight into their intellectual capital regarding development practices, NGOs in Southern Africa are required by donor agencies to describe their intended activities in very clear, unambiguous terms. These requirements may include the expression of theoretical approaches, the development of logical frameworks, clear objectives, indicators for success, criteria for sustainable development, and relationships to government policies. However, the interface between reality and these planning measures and tools, most often completed without the input and contributions of the communities whom they are to serve/service, produces a much more messy, dynamic, and involved picture of the development process. None the less, the NGOs are still required to be accountable on the basis of their original proposal and planning. The author presents examples of this phenomenon and discusses the challenges facing an evaluator when dealing with competing principles of accountability, autonomy, and authenticity. DA - 2008 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - Development in Practice KW - conflict and reconstruction KW - aid KW - civil society KW - Sub-Saharan Africa LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2008 SM - 0961-4524 T1 - Accountability autonomy and authenticity: assessing the development waltz conducted to a 'kwaito' beat in Southern Africa TI - Accountability autonomy and authenticity: assessing the development waltz conducted to a 'kwaito' beat in Southern Africa UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9841 ER - en_ZA


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