Modelling the current and potential distribution of woody plants, with special emphasis on the importance of spatial scale and environmental factors

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Richardson, Dave en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Cowling, Richard M en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Lavorel, Sandra en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Milton, Suzanne Jane en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Rouget, Mathieu en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-11-21T16:14:46Z
dc.date.available 2014-11-21T16:14:46Z
dc.date.issued 2002 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Rouget, M. 2002. Modelling the current and potential distribution of woody plants, with special emphasis on the importance of spatial scale and environmental factors. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9771
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract The relationship between species distribution and environment has always been a central issue in ecology. The primary aim of this thesis is to explore the role of abiotic and biotic factors in mediating the distribution of woody plants, particularly invasive alien species. Predictions of the future distribution of invasive species are required for management, conservation actions, and legislation. Using predictive geographical modelling, this thesis assesses the role of spatial scale in understanding the determinants of species distribution, modelling invasion spread, and taking conservation decisions. The species distribution databases were collated in a Geographic Information System from various sources (from field mapping to remote-sensing data), and at various spatial scales (from local to sub-continental). Classification and regression trees, a flexible non-parametric statistical technique, were developed for each case study. I show that static modelling approaches, such as classification trees, are appropriate for modelling species distribution at regional to sub-continental scales. More mechanistic approaches, which include biological attributes, are required for accurate modelling of species abundance at local scale. A hierarchy of environmental factors was observed. Abiotic factors such as climate were more important for modelling species distribution at broad scales, whereas biotic factors were the fine-scale drivers of species distribution and abundance. This highlights the scale- dependence of prediction accuracy and of environmental drivers. Predictive habitat modelling was also applied to modelling future land use changes (including invasive alien species) in the context of conservation planning for the Cape Floristic Region. Effective conservation planning requires a detailed assessment of current land use patterns and future land use scenarios. Conservation planning is generally derived at regional scale but implementation takes place at finer scales. I investigated the transition from broad-scale planning to fine-scale implementation. This work emphasises the importance of diverse and fragmented habitats in measuring conservation value. This thesis concludes by linking predictive habitat modelling, species determinants, and application types to the spatial scale analysed. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Botany en_ZA
dc.title Modelling the current and potential distribution of woody plants, with special emphasis on the importance of spatial scale and environmental factors en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Biological Sciences en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Rouget, M. (2002). <i>Modelling the current and potential distribution of woody plants, with special emphasis on the importance of spatial scale and environmental factors</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9771 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Rouget, Mathieu. <i>"Modelling the current and potential distribution of woody plants, with special emphasis on the importance of spatial scale and environmental factors."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 2002. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9771 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Rouget M. Modelling the current and potential distribution of woody plants, with special emphasis on the importance of spatial scale and environmental factors. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 2002 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9771 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Rouget, Mathieu AB - The relationship between species distribution and environment has always been a central issue in ecology. The primary aim of this thesis is to explore the role of abiotic and biotic factors in mediating the distribution of woody plants, particularly invasive alien species. Predictions of the future distribution of invasive species are required for management, conservation actions, and legislation. Using predictive geographical modelling, this thesis assesses the role of spatial scale in understanding the determinants of species distribution, modelling invasion spread, and taking conservation decisions. The species distribution databases were collated in a Geographic Information System from various sources (from field mapping to remote-sensing data), and at various spatial scales (from local to sub-continental). Classification and regression trees, a flexible non-parametric statistical technique, were developed for each case study. I show that static modelling approaches, such as classification trees, are appropriate for modelling species distribution at regional to sub-continental scales. More mechanistic approaches, which include biological attributes, are required for accurate modelling of species abundance at local scale. A hierarchy of environmental factors was observed. Abiotic factors such as climate were more important for modelling species distribution at broad scales, whereas biotic factors were the fine-scale drivers of species distribution and abundance. This highlights the scale- dependence of prediction accuracy and of environmental drivers. Predictive habitat modelling was also applied to modelling future land use changes (including invasive alien species) in the context of conservation planning for the Cape Floristic Region. Effective conservation planning requires a detailed assessment of current land use patterns and future land use scenarios. Conservation planning is generally derived at regional scale but implementation takes place at finer scales. I investigated the transition from broad-scale planning to fine-scale implementation. This work emphasises the importance of diverse and fragmented habitats in measuring conservation value. This thesis concludes by linking predictive habitat modelling, species determinants, and application types to the spatial scale analysed. DA - 2002 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2002 T1 - Modelling the current and potential distribution of woody plants, with special emphasis on the importance of spatial scale and environmental factors TI - Modelling the current and potential distribution of woody plants, with special emphasis on the importance of spatial scale and environmental factors UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9771 ER - en_ZA


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