Contributions to modern portfolio theory

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Dunne, Tim en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Page, Mike en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Raubenheimer, Heidi en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-11-20T03:58:21Z
dc.date.available 2014-11-20T03:58:21Z
dc.date.issued 2001 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Raubenheimer, H. 2001. Contributions to modern portfolio theory. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9741
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Fund managers and investors are confronted with the problem of selecting a single investment portfolio from a large number of possible combinations of available assets. In South Africa the set of possible portfolios has become even larger with the gradual relaxing of the constraints on foreign investment from 1995 to the present day, thereby expanding the investment universe for South African investors. Moreover, portfolio selection in South Africa is being transformed increasingly from being the exclusive domain of high net worth individuals, trustees and their investment managers to being the domain and responsibility of the man on the street. The Unit Trust industry started in South Africa in 1965 and gave the lower net worth individual a vehicle with which to invest in a diverse investment portfolio. This industry has proved very popular and has expanded from only 8 funds in 1980 to 338 funds and 136 billion rands under management in November 2000. Moreover the past two years, 1999 and 2000, has seen a change in the pension fund industry from defined benefit (DB) to defined contribution (DC) pension funds, transferring more of the risk and the responsibility of portfolio selection onto pension fund members. With increasing demand for fund management and investment advice by pension fund members and individual investors alike, the financial services industry in South Africa has also expanded. The consequent competition for assets of all descriptions have led, one hopes, to a more efficient market in equity, fixed income and derivative products. Thus modern portfolio theory has come a long way and will have to go further in meeting the demand to assist investors in their decision making. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Operational Research en_ZA
dc.title Contributions to modern portfolio theory en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Statistical Sciences en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MSc en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Raubenheimer, H. (2001). <i>Contributions to modern portfolio theory</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Statistical Sciences. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9741 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Raubenheimer, Heidi. <i>"Contributions to modern portfolio theory."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Statistical Sciences, 2001. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9741 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Raubenheimer H. Contributions to modern portfolio theory. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Statistical Sciences, 2001 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9741 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Raubenheimer, Heidi AB - Fund managers and investors are confronted with the problem of selecting a single investment portfolio from a large number of possible combinations of available assets. In South Africa the set of possible portfolios has become even larger with the gradual relaxing of the constraints on foreign investment from 1995 to the present day, thereby expanding the investment universe for South African investors. Moreover, portfolio selection in South Africa is being transformed increasingly from being the exclusive domain of high net worth individuals, trustees and their investment managers to being the domain and responsibility of the man on the street. The Unit Trust industry started in South Africa in 1965 and gave the lower net worth individual a vehicle with which to invest in a diverse investment portfolio. This industry has proved very popular and has expanded from only 8 funds in 1980 to 338 funds and 136 billion rands under management in November 2000. Moreover the past two years, 1999 and 2000, has seen a change in the pension fund industry from defined benefit (DB) to defined contribution (DC) pension funds, transferring more of the risk and the responsibility of portfolio selection onto pension fund members. With increasing demand for fund management and investment advice by pension fund members and individual investors alike, the financial services industry in South Africa has also expanded. The consequent competition for assets of all descriptions have led, one hopes, to a more efficient market in equity, fixed income and derivative products. Thus modern portfolio theory has come a long way and will have to go further in meeting the demand to assist investors in their decision making. DA - 2001 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2001 T1 - Contributions to modern portfolio theory TI - Contributions to modern portfolio theory UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9741 ER - en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record