“Of unsound mind”: a history of three Eastern Cape mental institutions, 1875-1910

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Mager, Anne en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Swanson, Felicity en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-11-18T17:05:59Z
dc.date.available 2014-11-18T17:05:59Z
dc.date.issued 2001 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Swanson, F. 2001. “Of unsound mind”: a history of three Eastern Cape mental institutions, 1875-1910. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9712
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract This thesis investigates the origins, development and consolidation of a regional network of three publicly funded and regulated mental institutions in the colonial Eastern Cape, between the years 1875 to 1910. Fort England asylum in Grahamstown was established in 1875. Port Alfred asylum followed in 1889 and the Fort Beaufort institution was opened in 1894. Each asylum retained its own distinctive character and function based on the nature of its patient population. Although geographically dispersed the asylums were intimately connected to each other, forming one integrated system to treat and manage the mentally ill. This thesis critically examines the changing patterns of care in these Eastern Cape institutions, during an important period of social, economic and political change in the Cape Colony. It traces the social and ideological construction of mental illness that was shaped by the racial, class and gendered hierarchies of colonial society. Based on empirical research, this thesis draws on Foucault's insights into the character and uses of disciplinary power implicated in the production of 'regimes of truth' about the mentally ill. The Eastern Cape institutions provide an important record of the ways in which the power invested in psychiatric theory and practice was exercised in a colonial context. In a moment hailed for its reform and progress in the treatment and care of mental illness, strategies for the exclusion, regulation and control of black mental patients were expanded in these Eastern Cape institutions. The major legacy in the treatment of mental illness in the Eastern Cape was the establishment of a system of control for black patients that was to inform future policy decisions after Union. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Historical Studies en_ZA
dc.title “Of unsound mind”: a history of three Eastern Cape mental institutions, 1875-1910 en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Historical Studies en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Swanson, F. (2001). <i>“Of unsound mind”: a history of three Eastern Cape mental institutions, 1875-1910</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Historical Studies. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9712 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Swanson, Felicity. <i>"“Of unsound mind”: a history of three Eastern Cape mental institutions, 1875-1910."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Historical Studies, 2001. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9712 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Swanson F. “Of unsound mind”: a history of three Eastern Cape mental institutions, 1875-1910. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Historical Studies, 2001 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9712 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Swanson, Felicity AB - This thesis investigates the origins, development and consolidation of a regional network of three publicly funded and regulated mental institutions in the colonial Eastern Cape, between the years 1875 to 1910. Fort England asylum in Grahamstown was established in 1875. Port Alfred asylum followed in 1889 and the Fort Beaufort institution was opened in 1894. Each asylum retained its own distinctive character and function based on the nature of its patient population. Although geographically dispersed the asylums were intimately connected to each other, forming one integrated system to treat and manage the mentally ill. This thesis critically examines the changing patterns of care in these Eastern Cape institutions, during an important period of social, economic and political change in the Cape Colony. It traces the social and ideological construction of mental illness that was shaped by the racial, class and gendered hierarchies of colonial society. Based on empirical research, this thesis draws on Foucault's insights into the character and uses of disciplinary power implicated in the production of 'regimes of truth' about the mentally ill. The Eastern Cape institutions provide an important record of the ways in which the power invested in psychiatric theory and practice was exercised in a colonial context. In a moment hailed for its reform and progress in the treatment and care of mental illness, strategies for the exclusion, regulation and control of black mental patients were expanded in these Eastern Cape institutions. The major legacy in the treatment of mental illness in the Eastern Cape was the establishment of a system of control for black patients that was to inform future policy decisions after Union. DA - 2001 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2001 T1 - “Of unsound mind”: a history of three Eastern Cape mental institutions, 1875-1910 TI - “Of unsound mind”: a history of three Eastern Cape mental institutions, 1875-1910 UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9712 ER - en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record