Health care financing and expenditure in Malawi : do efficiency and equity matter?

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor McIntyre, Di en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Mwase, Takondwa Lucious en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-11-16T19:57:06Z
dc.date.available 2014-11-16T19:57:06Z
dc.date.issued 1998 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Mwase, T. 1998. Health care financing and expenditure in Malawi : do efficiency and equity matter?. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9677
dc.description Bibliography: leaves 113-118. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract The Malawian sector spent about 3.3% of its GNP on health services in 1995/96. The public sector alone spent about 6.2% of its total revenue on health services and this is much high than most other Sub- Saharan African countries (e.g. Zambia, Kenya, Uganda). Despite such high levels of public expenditure, Malawi’s social and health indicators are among the worst in the world. The majority of the Malawian population suffer from a large amount of preventable illness and premature death which could be treated/prevented by simple inexpensive medical interventions. This scenario raises questions with regard to the government stated priority to primary health care and preventive health services. This investigation therefore was undertaken in order to quantify the total health care expenditure in Malawi and its distribution and then evaluate its equity and efficiency implications for the delivery of health services. The analyses focused on the public health sector due to the fact that the public health sector is the largest provider of health services in Malawi and its services are fiee of charge. It was therefore felt that a detailed analysis and evaluation of this sector could go a long way in improving the health status of the majority of Malawians within the resource envelope. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Health Economics en_ZA
dc.title Health care financing and expenditure in Malawi : do efficiency and equity matter? en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Health Economics Unit en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MSocSc en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Mwase, T. L. (1998). <i>Health care financing and expenditure in Malawi : do efficiency and equity matter?</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Health Economics Unit. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9677 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Mwase, Takondwa Lucious. <i>"Health care financing and expenditure in Malawi : do efficiency and equity matter?."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Health Economics Unit, 1998. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9677 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Mwase TL. Health care financing and expenditure in Malawi : do efficiency and equity matter?. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Health Economics Unit, 1998 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9677 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Mwase, Takondwa Lucious AB - The Malawian sector spent about 3.3% of its GNP on health services in 1995/96. The public sector alone spent about 6.2% of its total revenue on health services and this is much high than most other Sub- Saharan African countries (e.g. Zambia, Kenya, Uganda). Despite such high levels of public expenditure, Malawi’s social and health indicators are among the worst in the world. The majority of the Malawian population suffer from a large amount of preventable illness and premature death which could be treated/prevented by simple inexpensive medical interventions. This scenario raises questions with regard to the government stated priority to primary health care and preventive health services. This investigation therefore was undertaken in order to quantify the total health care expenditure in Malawi and its distribution and then evaluate its equity and efficiency implications for the delivery of health services. The analyses focused on the public health sector due to the fact that the public health sector is the largest provider of health services in Malawi and its services are fiee of charge. It was therefore felt that a detailed analysis and evaluation of this sector could go a long way in improving the health status of the majority of Malawians within the resource envelope. DA - 1998 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1998 T1 - Health care financing and expenditure in Malawi : do efficiency and equity matter? TI - Health care financing and expenditure in Malawi : do efficiency and equity matter? UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9677 ER - en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record