Studies of herbivory and vegetation change in Karoo shrublands

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Siegfried, W R en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Rutherford, MC en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Milton, Suzanne Jane en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-11-11T20:18:04Z
dc.date.available 2014-11-11T20:18:04Z
dc.date.issued 1993 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Milton, S. 1993. Studies of herbivory and vegetation change in Karoo shrublands. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9583
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract The broad objective of these studies was to view present landuse (extensive small stock ranching) in the Karoo against the background of relationships between indigenous plants and animals and to indicate how modification of herbivore regimes might affect this arid environment. Specific objectives were to determine how grazing by domestic livestock brings about vegetation change, why such changes are sometimes irreversible, and whether existing conceptual models of vegetation dynamics adequately explain the impact of domestic livestock on Karoo vegetation. Three interrelated aspects of plant-animal interactions were considered: the influence of herbivores on the evolution of Karoo plants, food selection by indigenotis and introduced herbivores and the effects of herbivory, competition and rainfall on plant reproduction and recruitment. The results of these investigations are presented as 14 papers. The first three papers interpret plant morphology and biogeography to provide information on past spatial and temporal use of the landscape by herbivores, and the next seven provide new information on food selection by invertebrates, indigenous vertebrates and by domestic sheep. Three papers examine the hypothesis that the reproductive output, survival and abundance of some Karoo plant species are influenced by herbivory. The possible consequences of various land management options on diversity and productivity of Karoo rangelands are discussed in the concluding paper. It was inferred, from biogeographic trends in the relative abundance of plants with thorns or propagules adapted for epizoochoric dispersal, that densities of large mammalian herbivores decreased from the north eastern to the southwestern Karoo. Within the most arid parts of the Karoo, mammalian herbivory appears to have been concentrated along drainage lines and in pans. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Zoology en_ZA
dc.title Studies of herbivory and vegetation change in Karoo shrublands en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Biological Sciences en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Milton, S. J. (1993). <i>Studies of herbivory and vegetation change in Karoo shrublands</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9583 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Milton, Suzanne Jane. <i>"Studies of herbivory and vegetation change in Karoo shrublands."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 1993. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9583 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Milton SJ. Studies of herbivory and vegetation change in Karoo shrublands. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 1993 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9583 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Milton, Suzanne Jane AB - The broad objective of these studies was to view present landuse (extensive small stock ranching) in the Karoo against the background of relationships between indigenous plants and animals and to indicate how modification of herbivore regimes might affect this arid environment. Specific objectives were to determine how grazing by domestic livestock brings about vegetation change, why such changes are sometimes irreversible, and whether existing conceptual models of vegetation dynamics adequately explain the impact of domestic livestock on Karoo vegetation. Three interrelated aspects of plant-animal interactions were considered: the influence of herbivores on the evolution of Karoo plants, food selection by indigenotis and introduced herbivores and the effects of herbivory, competition and rainfall on plant reproduction and recruitment. The results of these investigations are presented as 14 papers. The first three papers interpret plant morphology and biogeography to provide information on past spatial and temporal use of the landscape by herbivores, and the next seven provide new information on food selection by invertebrates, indigenous vertebrates and by domestic sheep. Three papers examine the hypothesis that the reproductive output, survival and abundance of some Karoo plant species are influenced by herbivory. The possible consequences of various land management options on diversity and productivity of Karoo rangelands are discussed in the concluding paper. It was inferred, from biogeographic trends in the relative abundance of plants with thorns or propagules adapted for epizoochoric dispersal, that densities of large mammalian herbivores decreased from the north eastern to the southwestern Karoo. Within the most arid parts of the Karoo, mammalian herbivory appears to have been concentrated along drainage lines and in pans. DA - 1993 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1993 T1 - Studies of herbivory and vegetation change in Karoo shrublands TI - Studies of herbivory and vegetation change in Karoo shrublands UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/9583 ER - en_ZA


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