Information management and dissemination of HIV/AIDS information by NGOs in Zimbabwe: An explanatory study

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Smith, Gretchen en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Matizirofa, Lazarus en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-10-23T07:06:39Z
dc.date.available 2014-10-23T07:06:39Z
dc.date.issued 2005 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Matizirofa, L. 2005. Information management and dissemination of HIV/AIDS information by NGOs in Zimbabwe: An explanatory study. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8726
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 99-119). en_ZA
dc.description.abstract The HIV/AIDS epidemic has become a serious health, social and economic problem in Zimbabwe. Almost 30 percent of the population had been infected by AIDS (Acquired immune Deficiency Syndrome) by 2004. The epidemic has also affected almost the entire population in one way or another - domestically, socially and economically. Zimbabwe faces a long-term development disaster because of the effects of the disease across the societal spectrum. AIDS is threatening every fibre of the nation from food supply to economic productivity, and not least human resource development. Many households have lost their principal source of income to the disease and have become impoverished. The national budget is increasingly under pressure as scarce resources are channelled to fight the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Despite a multitude of interventions aimed at preventing the scourge of the epidemic on the health system, the economy and human development, HIV/AIDS still presents a problem of enormous magnitude in Zimbabwe. It is argued that a major limitation of the various interventions to fight the pandemic has been the failure to extensively and effectively harness knowledge and disseminate information relating to all aspects of HIV/AIDS in Zimbabwe. The NGO sector, because of its grassroots involvement with the disease, is particularly well placed to fulfil such a role. The main aim of this study was to explore information and knowledge management and dissemination by HIV/AIDS NGOS in Zimbabwe. A further objective was to identity in the literature strategies that have been used, vis-a-vis modern information and knowledge management practice, in cognate sectors of development in Zimbabwe and other countries. It is argued that by applying appropriate information and knowledge management practices valuable knowledge and information that relate to how communities experience the problems and the impact associated with HlV/AIDS can be gathered and disseminated. Information and knowledge management is recommended by the United Nations' UNAIDS as the best way to harness both tacit and explicit information related to all aspects of the epidemic. A survey was conducted amongst 64 HIV/AIDS NGOs based in Harare, Zimbabwe. Data was collected using questionnaires, key informant interviews, and observation methods, and this was further supported by data collected from documentary and electronic sources. The main outcome of the study indicates that information and knowledge management is generally not well practised in the HIV/AIDS NGO sector in Zimbabwe. This is despite the fact that 75% of the NGOs had information services in place. Far too few qualified staff have been appointed to manage information services and this lack of professional skills has had a negative impact on HIV/AIDS information dissemination. It is argued that in a society such as in Zimbabwe, effective information dissemination measures are needed to assist social, economic and scientific interventions. It was further established that a sound information and knowledge management policy, and information technology developments were needed to address the information service challenges. The other main outcome showed that NGOS were not networking effectively among themselves, with government and other role players such as the private sector, educational institutions and churches, etc. Lastly, there was a strong indication that information technology, i.e., computers and accessories, the Internet, intranets, databases and audio-visuals, etc.. were not fully utilised, this is despite the fact that in other countries they have been very effective to assist in the creation, generation, gathering and diffusion of information. Based on the research outcomes, the researcher thus proposes that information and knowledge management practices should be set in place in the HIV/AIDS sector of Zimbabwe. NGOs should ensure that information services are run and manned by skilled and trained information officers. It is also suggested that government should be encouraged to become more involved and complement the work done by NGOs by reviewing the 1985 NLDS Act and other policy instruments. The study further recommends that, HIV/AIDS NGOs should work towards networking and providing a single shared dissemination source to the public, such as a national database, which would be hosted via a web-based internet portal. This would also enable NGOs to explore further networking efforts such as communities of practice (expert forums), a national HIV/AIDS bibliography and electronic publishing. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Library and Information Studies en_ZA
dc.title Information management and dissemination of HIV/AIDS information by NGOs in Zimbabwe: An explanatory study en_ZA
dc.type Thesis / Dissertation en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Unknown en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Library and Information Studies Centre (LISC) en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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