Handprints of the Western Cape : recording, measuring, identifying

 

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dc.contributor.author Meister, Conny en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-10-18T05:52:44Z
dc.date.available 2014-10-18T05:52:44Z
dc.date.issued 2003 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Meister, C. 2003. Handprints of the Western Cape : recording, measuring, identifying. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8586
dc.description Bibliography: leaves 158-171. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract The handprints of the western Cape of South Africa are a common phenomenon, yet remain one of the most unexplored and intriguing features within the rock art of this country. Known to occur mainly in the western Cape of South Africa. they represent a different style, class, and hence meaning of rock art. This dissertation is an approach to answer questions concerning the emergence and meaning of handprint-making in the western Cape. Through experiments, statistical analysis and hypotheses testing in the field on the original handprints. a different approach towards recording rock art, and in particular handprints, was investigated. One of the main aims is to examine whether we can distinguish between individual handprlnts and therefore individual people, and between groups of peopie and clusters of handprints of the same person. This examination will hopefully provide us with the opportunity to answer questions concerning the authorship of the handprints, as well as questions concerning the relationship between archaeological deposits and the rock art of the same sites. We might see whether the conceptions of previous researchers in the interpretation of their data were correct, and what remains indeterminable. To achieve this goal and truly understand the meaning and the reasons behind the making of the handprints, a methodology and technique needed to be established which allowed for highly accurate recording and later assessment of the measurements of archaeological handprints. For this reason, I chose to digitally obtain the data with close-range photogrammetry. This technique offered a fast and efficient way of creating sets of measurable data for further analysis. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Archaeology en_ZA
dc.title Handprints of the Western Cape : recording, measuring, identifying en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Archaeology en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MSc en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Meister, C. (2003). <i>Handprints of the Western Cape : recording, measuring, identifying</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Archaeology. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8586 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Meister, Conny. <i>"Handprints of the Western Cape : recording, measuring, identifying."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Archaeology, 2003. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8586 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Meister C. Handprints of the Western Cape : recording, measuring, identifying. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Archaeology, 2003 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8586 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Meister, Conny AB - The handprints of the western Cape of South Africa are a common phenomenon, yet remain one of the most unexplored and intriguing features within the rock art of this country. Known to occur mainly in the western Cape of South Africa. they represent a different style, class, and hence meaning of rock art. This dissertation is an approach to answer questions concerning the emergence and meaning of handprint-making in the western Cape. Through experiments, statistical analysis and hypotheses testing in the field on the original handprints. a different approach towards recording rock art, and in particular handprints, was investigated. One of the main aims is to examine whether we can distinguish between individual handprlnts and therefore individual people, and between groups of peopie and clusters of handprints of the same person. This examination will hopefully provide us with the opportunity to answer questions concerning the authorship of the handprints, as well as questions concerning the relationship between archaeological deposits and the rock art of the same sites. We might see whether the conceptions of previous researchers in the interpretation of their data were correct, and what remains indeterminable. To achieve this goal and truly understand the meaning and the reasons behind the making of the handprints, a methodology and technique needed to be established which allowed for highly accurate recording and later assessment of the measurements of archaeological handprints. For this reason, I chose to digitally obtain the data with close-range photogrammetry. This technique offered a fast and efficient way of creating sets of measurable data for further analysis. DA - 2003 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2003 T1 - Handprints of the Western Cape : recording, measuring, identifying TI - Handprints of the Western Cape : recording, measuring, identifying UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8586 ER - en_ZA


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