The ecology and control of typha capensis in the wetlands of the Cape flats, South Africa

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Davies, Bryan en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Moll, Eugene en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Hall, Deborah Jane en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-10-17T07:33:24Z
dc.date.available 2014-10-17T07:33:24Z
dc.date.issued 1993 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Hall, D. 1993. The ecology and control of typha capensis in the wetlands of the Cape flats, South Africa. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8493
dc.description Includes bibliographies. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Typha capensis is indigenous to the Cape, but is thought to be threatening Cape Flats wetlands through invasion and encroachment. This thesis establishes the extent of such encroachment and investigates aspects of the phenology, life-history, growth, production and decomposition of the species in a Cape Flats wetland. The process of invasion by indigenous species rather than by alien species is discussed and the view that wetlands are threatened by mismanagement rather than by encroachment per se is examined. Finally, control methods particularly suited to local environmental and economic conditions are evaluated. T. capensis was shown to be typical of invasive plant species and is spreading in some wetlands. Encroachment is usually associated with the stabilisation of seasonal water-level fluctuations and under these conditions stands were spreading at 1.5m month. Demographic methods used to measure growth, production and decomposition made it possible to quantify leaf fragmentation and shoot collapse, processes that are generally ignored during decomposition studies. Results showed that the structure of Typha stands is related to flood regime, and that flood regime has an important effect on production, litter formation and decomposition. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng
dc.subject.other Zoology en_ZA
dc.title The ecology and control of typha capensis in the wetlands of the Cape flats, South Africa en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Biological Sciences en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Hall, D. J. (1993). <i>The ecology and control of typha capensis in the wetlands of the Cape flats, South Africa</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8493 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Hall, Deborah Jane. <i>"The ecology and control of typha capensis in the wetlands of the Cape flats, South Africa."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 1993. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8493 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Hall DJ. The ecology and control of typha capensis in the wetlands of the Cape flats, South Africa. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 1993 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8493 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Hall, Deborah Jane AB - Typha capensis is indigenous to the Cape, but is thought to be threatening Cape Flats wetlands through invasion and encroachment. This thesis establishes the extent of such encroachment and investigates aspects of the phenology, life-history, growth, production and decomposition of the species in a Cape Flats wetland. The process of invasion by indigenous species rather than by alien species is discussed and the view that wetlands are threatened by mismanagement rather than by encroachment per se is examined. Finally, control methods particularly suited to local environmental and economic conditions are evaluated. T. capensis was shown to be typical of invasive plant species and is spreading in some wetlands. Encroachment is usually associated with the stabilisation of seasonal water-level fluctuations and under these conditions stands were spreading at 1.5m month. Demographic methods used to measure growth, production and decomposition made it possible to quantify leaf fragmentation and shoot collapse, processes that are generally ignored during decomposition studies. Results showed that the structure of Typha stands is related to flood regime, and that flood regime has an important effect on production, litter formation and decomposition. DA - 1993 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1993 T1 - The ecology and control of typha capensis in the wetlands of the Cape flats, South Africa TI - The ecology and control of typha capensis in the wetlands of the Cape flats, South Africa UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8493 ER - en_ZA


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