The trend towards sociality in three species of southern African mole-rats (Bathyergidae) : causes and consequences

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Jarvis, J U M en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Bennett, Nigel Charles en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-10-11T12:21:40Z
dc.date.available 2014-10-11T12:21:40Z
dc.date.issued 1988 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Bennett, N. 1988. The trend towards sociality in three species of southern African mole-rats (Bathyergidae) : causes and consequences. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8413
dc.description Includes bibliographies. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Three species of southern African mole-rats, possessing a wide range of social organisation were used to investigate the trend towards increasing sociality occurring in species inhabiting increasingly arid environments. The strictly solitary Georychus capensis, the weakly social Cryptomys hottentotus hottentotus and the highly social Cryptomys damarensis were chosen for this investigation and my findings are compared, where possible, with the eusocial Heterocephalus glaber. The level of social organisation exhibited by a particular mole-rat species appears to be dependent upon a number of physical factors as well as on the food resource distribution, its nutritional properties and its availability. Thus the soil moisture content, the annual rainfall pattern and the wear upon the extrabuccal incisors limit the amount of burrowing which can be undertaken by a single mole-rat, both on a daily and seasonal basis. These factors together with the size, distribution, digestible energy and fibre content of the geophytes on which they feed and nearest-neighbour distances occurring between the belowground portions of the geophytes, may be crucial in determining whether a habitat is suitable for solitary or colonial mole-rats. en_ZA
dc.subject.other Zoology en_ZA
dc.title The trend towards sociality in three species of southern African mole-rats (Bathyergidae) : causes and consequences en_ZA
dc.type Thesis / Dissertation en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Biological Sciences en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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