Biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal on large plants.

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Marais, Gerrit van Rooyen en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Nicholls, Harold Arthur en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-10-11T11:59:48Z
dc.date.available 2014-10-11T11:59:48Z
dc.date.issued 1983 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Nicholls, H. 1983. Biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal on large plants. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8307
dc.description Includes bibliography. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Full scale implementation of biological excess phosphorus removal by means of the activated sludge process commenced in South Africa at the Johannesburg Alexandra Plant in 1974. Originally the plant was designed to operate in the nitrifying extended aeration mode; but by switching off some surface aerators around the common inlet point for the influent and underflow recycle, an anoxic zone was created to induce denitrification. This operational modification worked very successfully. Later additional aerators were switched off to create an anaerobic-anoxic zone at the head of the aeration basin, in this manner attempting to induce the prerequisite conditions for excess biological uptake of phosphorus as put forward by Barnard (i.e. by stimulating P release under anaerobic conditions). This revised operational procedure was not successful due to difficulties experienced in controlling mixing in the anaerobic - anoxic zone. However the experience gained from this investigation together with research findings at laboratory and pilot scale level at the National Institute for Water Research, the University of Cape Town, and Johannesburg instilled sufficient confidence into City Council staff to proceed with the' design of the 150 Ml/d Goudkoppie Plant, initially for nitrogen removal and to subsequently modify it to a 5 stage Phoredox process for both nitrogen and phosphorus removal. Before the plant was commissioned (1976) it was necessary to proceed with extensions to the Northern Works and these were also based on the 5 stage Phoredox process. All the Johannesburg activated sludge plants were comprehensively monitored to determine their performance under cyclic flow and load conditions, The data collected from the Goudkoppie plant were particularly comprehensive and exhaustive. Concomitant with the monitoring program extensive research into the single stage nitrification/denitrification/excess phosphorus removal process was being undertaken by the three agencies mentioned earlier. Of particular interest was the development by the University of Cape Town of a general kinetic model of the single sludge activated sludge process that described carbonaceous degradation, nitrification and denitrification behaviour under cyclic flow and load conditions. This dissertation critically evaluates the predictions of this model against the observed responses on the Goudkoppie and Northern Works. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng
dc.subject.other Civil engineering en_ZA
dc.title Biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal on large plants. en_ZA
dc.type Masters Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Civil Engineering en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MSc en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Nicholls, H. A. (1983). <i>Biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal on large plants</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Civil Engineering. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8307 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Nicholls, Harold Arthur. <i>"Biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal on large plants."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Civil Engineering, 1983. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8307 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Nicholls HA. Biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal on large plants. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Civil Engineering, 1983 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8307 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Nicholls, Harold Arthur AB - Full scale implementation of biological excess phosphorus removal by means of the activated sludge process commenced in South Africa at the Johannesburg Alexandra Plant in 1974. Originally the plant was designed to operate in the nitrifying extended aeration mode; but by switching off some surface aerators around the common inlet point for the influent and underflow recycle, an anoxic zone was created to induce denitrification. This operational modification worked very successfully. Later additional aerators were switched off to create an anaerobic-anoxic zone at the head of the aeration basin, in this manner attempting to induce the prerequisite conditions for excess biological uptake of phosphorus as put forward by Barnard (i.e. by stimulating P release under anaerobic conditions). This revised operational procedure was not successful due to difficulties experienced in controlling mixing in the anaerobic - anoxic zone. However the experience gained from this investigation together with research findings at laboratory and pilot scale level at the National Institute for Water Research, the University of Cape Town, and Johannesburg instilled sufficient confidence into City Council staff to proceed with the' design of the 150 Ml/d Goudkoppie Plant, initially for nitrogen removal and to subsequently modify it to a 5 stage Phoredox process for both nitrogen and phosphorus removal. Before the plant was commissioned (1976) it was necessary to proceed with extensions to the Northern Works and these were also based on the 5 stage Phoredox process. All the Johannesburg activated sludge plants were comprehensively monitored to determine their performance under cyclic flow and load conditions, The data collected from the Goudkoppie plant were particularly comprehensive and exhaustive. Concomitant with the monitoring program extensive research into the single stage nitrification/denitrification/excess phosphorus removal process was being undertaken by the three agencies mentioned earlier. Of particular interest was the development by the University of Cape Town of a general kinetic model of the single sludge activated sludge process that described carbonaceous degradation, nitrification and denitrification behaviour under cyclic flow and load conditions. This dissertation critically evaluates the predictions of this model against the observed responses on the Goudkoppie and Northern Works. DA - 1983 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1983 T1 - Biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal on large plants TI - Biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal on large plants UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8307 ER - en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record