The role of sleep in creative task performance

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Thomas, Kevin en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Hodge, Anthony en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-10-08T09:43:59Z
dc.date.available 2014-10-08T09:43:59Z
dc.date.issued 2009 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Hodge, A. 2009. The role of sleep in creative task performance. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8265
dc.description Includes abstract. en_ZA
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 84-91). en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Anecdotal evidence suggests that sleep can aid in creative performance, but few studies have systematically investigated this association. Prior research suggests that creative thinking, particularly divergent cognition, is similar to mental states found in sleep and dreaming, especially during REM sleep. Studies have found that sleep benefits general learning and problem-solving, and facilitates insight that promotes enhanced performance on cognitive tasks. This study investigated the effects of sleep on performance with verbal and visual tasks that explicitly require creative ability. I hypothesised that participants with a period of sleep between task preparation and execution would perform better than participants with an equal period of REM-deprived sleep, daytime wakefulness, or no interval between preparation and execution, but there would be no difference in performance between the participants in terms of convergent cognition. The study was a 4-level, single-factor design, with state of consciousness as the manipulated variable. Participants (n = 87) were recruited from the university undergraduate population. Participants memorised a wordlist for task preparation and then, after an interval of either normal sleep, REM-deprived sleep, waking activity, or no interval, used the same wordlist to write a creative short story for task execution. The stories were assessed for creativity-related constructs by the researcher and independent raters. Participants also completed a visual design fluency task at both stages of the study, following a 4-level, single-factor, repeated-measures design. Participants' scores on the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking (TTCT) Verbal Edition and the Shipley Institute of Living Scale (SILS) were used to control for general creative ability and IQ respectively. ANCOVA, repeated measures ANOVA, and Fisher's r to z transformation statistics were used to analyse the data. Although generally the hypotheses were not directly supported by the data obtained, trends suggest that there was a connection between sleep and creativity, especially an apparent interaction between baseline creativity and the type of interval. Based on the indirect evidence obtained, directions for future research for investigating sleep and creativity are discussed. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Psychological Research en_ZA
dc.title The role of sleep in creative task performance en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Psychology en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Hodge, A. (2009). <i>The role of sleep in creative task performance</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Psychology. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8265 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Hodge, Anthony. <i>"The role of sleep in creative task performance."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Psychology, 2009. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8265 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Hodge A. The role of sleep in creative task performance. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Psychology, 2009 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8265 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Hodge, Anthony AB - Anecdotal evidence suggests that sleep can aid in creative performance, but few studies have systematically investigated this association. Prior research suggests that creative thinking, particularly divergent cognition, is similar to mental states found in sleep and dreaming, especially during REM sleep. Studies have found that sleep benefits general learning and problem-solving, and facilitates insight that promotes enhanced performance on cognitive tasks. This study investigated the effects of sleep on performance with verbal and visual tasks that explicitly require creative ability. I hypothesised that participants with a period of sleep between task preparation and execution would perform better than participants with an equal period of REM-deprived sleep, daytime wakefulness, or no interval between preparation and execution, but there would be no difference in performance between the participants in terms of convergent cognition. The study was a 4-level, single-factor design, with state of consciousness as the manipulated variable. Participants (n = 87) were recruited from the university undergraduate population. Participants memorised a wordlist for task preparation and then, after an interval of either normal sleep, REM-deprived sleep, waking activity, or no interval, used the same wordlist to write a creative short story for task execution. The stories were assessed for creativity-related constructs by the researcher and independent raters. Participants also completed a visual design fluency task at both stages of the study, following a 4-level, single-factor, repeated-measures design. Participants' scores on the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking (TTCT) Verbal Edition and the Shipley Institute of Living Scale (SILS) were used to control for general creative ability and IQ respectively. ANCOVA, repeated measures ANOVA, and Fisher's r to z transformation statistics were used to analyse the data. Although generally the hypotheses were not directly supported by the data obtained, trends suggest that there was a connection between sleep and creativity, especially an apparent interaction between baseline creativity and the type of interval. Based on the indirect evidence obtained, directions for future research for investigating sleep and creativity are discussed. DA - 2009 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2009 T1 - The role of sleep in creative task performance TI - The role of sleep in creative task performance UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8265 ER - en_ZA


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