Separation-distress as an affective mechanism of OCD

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Solms, Mark en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Jackson, Michelle en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-10-08T09:43:57Z
dc.date.available 2014-10-08T09:43:57Z
dc.date.issued 2009 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Jackson, M. 2009. Separation-distress as an affective mechanism of OCD. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8264
dc.description Includes abstract. en_ZA
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 162-171). en_ZA
dc.description.abstract In this thesis, a series of four studies were carried out to address the question of whether separation distress (the associated feeling state of the basic emotion substrate PANIC; Panksepp, 1998) is a significant constituent of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). The aim was to characterize more accurately the affective nature of the disorder. Separation-distress and separation trauma were examined in samples of people with high scores on measures of obsessionality and low mood, and in patients with clinical OCD and depression; as well as in control groups. The Meta-Cognitions Questionnaire (Cartwright-Hatton & Wells, 1997) Padua Inventory (Sanavio, 1988), Major Depression Inventory (Olsen, Jensen, Noerholm, Martiny, & Bech, 2003) and Positive and Negative Affect Scales (Watson, Clark, & Tellegen, 1988) were used to position participants from low- to high-scoring on spectrums of obsessionality and low mood (Studies I and II) and of OCD and depression (Studies III and IV). Participants were then evaluated on measures of separation-distress, using the Separation Anxiety Symptom Inventory (Silove et al., 1993), the Structured Clinical Interview for Separation Anxiety Symptoms (Cyranowski et al., 2002), the Adult Separation Anxiety Checklist (Manicavasagar, Silove, Wagner, & Drobny, 2003) and the Affective Neuroscience Personality Scales (Davis, Panksepp, & Normansell, 2003). Descriptive and inferential statistics, including correlational analysis, independent and dependent t tests and mediation, confirmed that separation-distress is significantly and consistently higher in those who score higher on obsessionality and low mood, as well as in patients with OCD and depression. Heightened separation-distress is therefore strongly implicated in both OCD and depression. It was also found to be a critical variable in the well-recognized comorbidity of the two disorders. Chisquare contingency analysis was performed on the categorical data collected for early separation trauma experiences. The results showed that the development of OCD and/or depression in adulthood is highly contingent on the experience of separation trauma during critical early life periods. The main hypothesis, that separation-distress is a central affective mechanism of OCD, was confirmed. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Psychology en_ZA
dc.title Separation-distress as an affective mechanism of OCD en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Psychology en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Jackson, M. (2009). <i>Separation-distress as an affective mechanism of OCD</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Psychology. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8264 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Jackson, Michelle. <i>"Separation-distress as an affective mechanism of OCD."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Psychology, 2009. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8264 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Jackson M. Separation-distress as an affective mechanism of OCD. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Psychology, 2009 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8264 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Jackson, Michelle AB - In this thesis, a series of four studies were carried out to address the question of whether separation distress (the associated feeling state of the basic emotion substrate PANIC; Panksepp, 1998) is a significant constituent of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). The aim was to characterize more accurately the affective nature of the disorder. Separation-distress and separation trauma were examined in samples of people with high scores on measures of obsessionality and low mood, and in patients with clinical OCD and depression; as well as in control groups. The Meta-Cognitions Questionnaire (Cartwright-Hatton &amp; Wells, 1997) Padua Inventory (Sanavio, 1988), Major Depression Inventory (Olsen, Jensen, Noerholm, Martiny, &amp; Bech, 2003) and Positive and Negative Affect Scales (Watson, Clark, &amp; Tellegen, 1988) were used to position participants from low- to high-scoring on spectrums of obsessionality and low mood (Studies I and II) and of OCD and depression (Studies III and IV). Participants were then evaluated on measures of separation-distress, using the Separation Anxiety Symptom Inventory (Silove et al., 1993), the Structured Clinical Interview for Separation Anxiety Symptoms (Cyranowski et al., 2002), the Adult Separation Anxiety Checklist (Manicavasagar, Silove, Wagner, &amp; Drobny, 2003) and the Affective Neuroscience Personality Scales (Davis, Panksepp, &amp; Normansell, 2003). Descriptive and inferential statistics, including correlational analysis, independent and dependent t tests and mediation, confirmed that separation-distress is significantly and consistently higher in those who score higher on obsessionality and low mood, as well as in patients with OCD and depression. Heightened separation-distress is therefore strongly implicated in both OCD and depression. It was also found to be a critical variable in the well-recognized comorbidity of the two disorders. Chisquare contingency analysis was performed on the categorical data collected for early separation trauma experiences. The results showed that the development of OCD and/or depression in adulthood is highly contingent on the experience of separation trauma during critical early life periods. The main hypothesis, that separation-distress is a central affective mechanism of OCD, was confirmed. DA - 2009 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2009 T1 - Separation-distress as an affective mechanism of OCD TI - Separation-distress as an affective mechanism of OCD UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8264 ER - en_ZA


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