Exploring the tension between Coleridge's Poetic Faith and disbelief in the metatheatrical strategies used in a Mask, a Key and a Pair of Broken Wings

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Pather, Jay en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Keevy, Jon en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-10-06T11:34:19Z
dc.date.available 2014-10-06T11:34:19Z
dc.date.issued 2007 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Keevy, J. 2007. Exploring the tension between Coleridge's Poetic Faith and disbelief in the metatheatrical strategies used in a Mask, a Key and a Pair of Broken Wings. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8156
dc.description Includes abstract. en_ZA
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 30-33). en_ZA
dc.description.abstract This explication is focused on the metatheatrical strategies employed in my thesis production: a Mask, a Key and a Pair of Broken Wings, a triptych of three short plays. The paper pursues a deeper understanding of the nature of an audience's engagement with onstage narratives. The production explores existential dilemmas through stories about runaways and escapees. Jean Paul Sartre's Being and Nothingness (first published 1943) can be construed as a map of the territories that the stories explore. I also employ a Sartrean style of argument in the unpacking ofthe strategies applied in the production's staging. A cornerstone of both the narrative and academic inquiry is Sartre's notion of 'bad faith' and the construction of self through it. In order to fully explore the constructedness of self, the production is done in a metatheatrical form. Metatheatre was coined by Lionel Abel to describe plays that consciously drew attention to their own construction. It is an appropriate form to expose the layers of relationships between the real and the performed. In order to better understand the nature of audience engagement the paper considers two relatively unused sources of dramatic theory, Coleridge and Tolkien. Coleridge's writings in Bibliographia Literaria (first published 1817) on disbelief and poetic faith are used to discuss the receptivity of an audience, while Tolkien's concept of the division between the primary and secondary worlds allows the discussion of what the audience perceives. The key distinction between disbelief and poetic faith is the distinction between intellectual objection and emotional ascent to a secondary world. By discussing the tactics of Metatheatre to be used in a Mask. a Key and a Pair of Broken Wings, the benefits and pitfalls of each strategy is revealed. My argument describes the possible effects of these on an audience's consciousness as the results of variations in the relative strengths of their intellectual and emotional perceptions. Metatheatre is a rupture of the secondary world, the object of the audience's poetic faith. Metatheatre can be a powerful tool in the theatremaker's arsenal only by understanding how poetic faith and disbelief function in tension and in harmony with one another. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Theatre and Performance en_ZA
dc.title Exploring the tension between Coleridge's Poetic Faith and disbelief in the metatheatrical strategies used in a Mask, a Key and a Pair of Broken Wings en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Drama en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Keevy, J. (2007). <i>Exploring the tension between Coleridge's Poetic Faith and disbelief in the metatheatrical strategies used in a Mask, a Key and a Pair of Broken Wings</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Drama. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8156 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Keevy, Jon. <i>"Exploring the tension between Coleridge's Poetic Faith and disbelief in the metatheatrical strategies used in a Mask, a Key and a Pair of Broken Wings."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Drama, 2007. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8156 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Keevy J. Exploring the tension between Coleridge's Poetic Faith and disbelief in the metatheatrical strategies used in a Mask, a Key and a Pair of Broken Wings. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Drama, 2007 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8156 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Keevy, Jon AB - This explication is focused on the metatheatrical strategies employed in my thesis production: a Mask, a Key and a Pair of Broken Wings, a triptych of three short plays. The paper pursues a deeper understanding of the nature of an audience's engagement with onstage narratives. The production explores existential dilemmas through stories about runaways and escapees. Jean Paul Sartre's Being and Nothingness (first published 1943) can be construed as a map of the territories that the stories explore. I also employ a Sartrean style of argument in the unpacking ofthe strategies applied in the production's staging. A cornerstone of both the narrative and academic inquiry is Sartre's notion of 'bad faith' and the construction of self through it. In order to fully explore the constructedness of self, the production is done in a metatheatrical form. Metatheatre was coined by Lionel Abel to describe plays that consciously drew attention to their own construction. It is an appropriate form to expose the layers of relationships between the real and the performed. In order to better understand the nature of audience engagement the paper considers two relatively unused sources of dramatic theory, Coleridge and Tolkien. Coleridge's writings in Bibliographia Literaria (first published 1817) on disbelief and poetic faith are used to discuss the receptivity of an audience, while Tolkien's concept of the division between the primary and secondary worlds allows the discussion of what the audience perceives. The key distinction between disbelief and poetic faith is the distinction between intellectual objection and emotional ascent to a secondary world. By discussing the tactics of Metatheatre to be used in a Mask. a Key and a Pair of Broken Wings, the benefits and pitfalls of each strategy is revealed. My argument describes the possible effects of these on an audience's consciousness as the results of variations in the relative strengths of their intellectual and emotional perceptions. Metatheatre is a rupture of the secondary world, the object of the audience's poetic faith. Metatheatre can be a powerful tool in the theatremaker's arsenal only by understanding how poetic faith and disbelief function in tension and in harmony with one another. DA - 2007 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2007 T1 - Exploring the tension between Coleridge's Poetic Faith and disbelief in the metatheatrical strategies used in a Mask, a Key and a Pair of Broken Wings TI - Exploring the tension between Coleridge's Poetic Faith and disbelief in the metatheatrical strategies used in a Mask, a Key and a Pair of Broken Wings UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8156 ER - en_ZA


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