Language and dementia in bilingual settings : evidence from two case studies

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Young, Douglas en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Ferreira, Monica en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Makoni, Sinfree en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Beckett, Tracy en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-10-02T13:15:00Z
dc.date.available 2014-10-02T13:15:00Z
dc.date.issued 2004 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Beckett, T. 2004. Language and dementia in bilingual settings : evidence from two case studies. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/7957
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 82-104). en_ZA
dc.description.abstract This study used qualitative methodology for an analysis of the conversations of two communication-impaired bilingual elders diagnosed with a mild/moderate stage of Alzheimers's disease (AD). The aim of the study was to investigate the linguistic consequences of cognitive decline on language in English-Afrikaans co-ordinate bilinguals with AD by monitoring the changes in these linguistic outcomes after three months, and to see whether the two languaes are affected by AD in a comparable way. The impact of conversational disorders on clinicians and caregivers needs to be investigated to determine the full impact of a communication disorder such as AD from the perspective of the impaired speaker and the conversational partner, to functionally improve communication, self-esteem and psychosocial well-being. The results are based on observations and audio recordings of conversations with two participants. The results are presented broadly to demonstrate the participants' typical linguistic behaviour and reveal linguistic behaviour as a continuum that includes elements of both languages. Wide use of L1q in conversation domains that were allocated to the L2 was noted. The results show that the severity of AD and language proficiency are major contributing factors for language mixing. As the disease progressed, the conversational partner carried the cognitive responsibility for upholding/maintaining the conversation. Emerging from the study is an enhanced awareness of the need to combine studies in bilingualism with studies in ageing, since research of this nature is still in its infancy in applied language studies and applied linguistics in Africa. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Applied Language Studies en_ZA
dc.title Language and dementia in bilingual settings : evidence from two case studies en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Centre for Applied Language and Literacy Studies and Services in Africa en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MPhil en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Beckett, T. (2004). <i>Language and dementia in bilingual settings : evidence from two case studies</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Centre for Applied Language and Literacy Studies and Services in Africa. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/7957 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Beckett, Tracy. <i>"Language and dementia in bilingual settings : evidence from two case studies."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Centre for Applied Language and Literacy Studies and Services in Africa, 2004. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/7957 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Beckett T. Language and dementia in bilingual settings : evidence from two case studies. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Centre for Applied Language and Literacy Studies and Services in Africa, 2004 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/7957 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Beckett, Tracy AB - This study used qualitative methodology for an analysis of the conversations of two communication-impaired bilingual elders diagnosed with a mild/moderate stage of Alzheimers's disease (AD). The aim of the study was to investigate the linguistic consequences of cognitive decline on language in English-Afrikaans co-ordinate bilinguals with AD by monitoring the changes in these linguistic outcomes after three months, and to see whether the two languaes are affected by AD in a comparable way. The impact of conversational disorders on clinicians and caregivers needs to be investigated to determine the full impact of a communication disorder such as AD from the perspective of the impaired speaker and the conversational partner, to functionally improve communication, self-esteem and psychosocial well-being. The results are based on observations and audio recordings of conversations with two participants. The results are presented broadly to demonstrate the participants' typical linguistic behaviour and reveal linguistic behaviour as a continuum that includes elements of both languages. Wide use of L1q in conversation domains that were allocated to the L2 was noted. The results show that the severity of AD and language proficiency are major contributing factors for language mixing. As the disease progressed, the conversational partner carried the cognitive responsibility for upholding/maintaining the conversation. Emerging from the study is an enhanced awareness of the need to combine studies in bilingualism with studies in ageing, since research of this nature is still in its infancy in applied language studies and applied linguistics in Africa. DA - 2004 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2004 T1 - Language and dementia in bilingual settings : evidence from two case studies TI - Language and dementia in bilingual settings : evidence from two case studies UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/7957 ER - en_ZA


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