Peer educators’ responses to mistrust and confusion about HIV and AIDS science in Khayelitsha, South Africa

 

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dc.contributor.author Rubincam, Clara
dc.coverage.spatial South Africa ; Western Cape ; Khayelitshs en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-10-01T08:51:57Z
dc.date.available 2014-10-01T08:51:57Z
dc.date.issued 2014-08-30
dc.identifier.citation Rubincam, C. Peer educators’ responses to mistrust and confusion about HIV and AIDS science in Khayelitsha, South Africa. CSSR Working Paper No. 343. Cape Town: Centre for Social Science Research, University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.isbn 978-1-77011-330-5 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/7879
dc.description.abstract Peer educators are on the front lines of communication between sources of scientific authority about HIV and AIDS and target populations. This study focuses on a group of peer educators from the Treatment Action Campaign working in Khayelitsha, South Africa (n=20), highlighting perceptions of their treatment literacy activities and the challenges faced in these encounters. In order to maintain clients’ trust in themselves and their information about HIV, they employ various “rhetorics of persuasion”, including accurate mobilisation of biomedical facts, personal testimonies, and figurative language such as parables and metaphors. These tactics build on community members’ everyday observations and experiences and draw from peer educators’ own credibility and trustworthiness as TAC members, and as members of the community. This paper draws attention to the ways in which peer educators’ personal agency and judgement are brought to the task of peer education, as well as the implications for future programmes using treatment literacy to advocate on behalf of biomedical facts about HIV and AIDS. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.relation.ispartofseries CSSR Working Paper Series ; 353 en_ZA
dc.rights Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ *
dc.subject Treatment Action Campaign en_ZA
dc.subject HIV infections en_ZA
dc.subject AIDS (Disease) en_ZA
dc.title Peer educators’ responses to mistrust and confusion about HIV and AIDS science in Khayelitsha, South Africa en_ZA
dc.type Working Paper en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Working paper en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Aids and Society Research Unit en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Rubincam, C. (2014). <i>Peer educators’ responses to mistrust and confusion about HIV and AIDS science in Khayelitsha, South Africa</i> (CSSR Working Paper Series ; 353). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Aids and Society Research Unit. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/7879 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Rubincam, Clara <i>Peer educators’ responses to mistrust and confusion about HIV and AIDS science in Khayelitsha, South Africa.</i> CSSR Working Paper Series ; 353. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Aids and Society Research Unit, 2014. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/7879 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Rubincam C. Peer educators’ responses to mistrust and confusion about HIV and AIDS science in Khayelitsha, South Africa. 2014 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/7879 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Working Paper AU - Rubincam, Clara AB - Peer educators are on the front lines of communication between sources of scientific authority about HIV and AIDS and target populations. This study focuses on a group of peer educators from the Treatment Action Campaign working in Khayelitsha, South Africa (n=20), highlighting perceptions of their treatment literacy activities and the challenges faced in these encounters. In order to maintain clients’ trust in themselves and their information about HIV, they employ various “rhetorics of persuasion”, including accurate mobilisation of biomedical facts, personal testimonies, and figurative language such as parables and metaphors. These tactics build on community members’ everyday observations and experiences and draw from peer educators’ own credibility and trustworthiness as TAC members, and as members of the community. This paper draws attention to the ways in which peer educators’ personal agency and judgement are brought to the task of peer education, as well as the implications for future programmes using treatment literacy to advocate on behalf of biomedical facts about HIV and AIDS. DA - 2014-08-30 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town KW - Treatment Action Campaign KW - HIV infections KW - AIDS (Disease) LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2014 SM - 978-1-77011-330-5 T1 - Peer educators’ responses to mistrust and confusion about HIV and AIDS science in Khayelitsha, South Africa TI - Peer educators’ responses to mistrust and confusion about HIV and AIDS science in Khayelitsha, South Africa UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/7879 ER - en_ZA


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