Walking into Words: selected British writers

 

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dc.contributor.author Moorcroft-Wilson, Jean
dc.date 2014-01-20
dc.date.accessioned 2014-09-29T10:50:51Z
dc.date.available 2014-09-29T10:50:51Z
dc.date.issued 2014-09-29
dc.identifier.citation Moorcroft-Wilson, J. 2014-09-29. Walking into Words: selected British writers. Recorded lecture. University of Cape Town Summer School 2014. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/7733
dc.description.abstract ‘I walk, therefore I write’ might be the motto for a group of British writers as otherwise diverse as Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, Virginia Woolf, Bruce Chatwin and Robert MacFarlane. Writing based on walking is more than just a Romantic vogue inspired by Rousseau’s Reveries of a Solitary Walker. It stretches back in England at least as far as Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. Among other things walking seems to provide writers with subject, plot, structure, a sense of history and tradition, social comment, even humour. Whether you walk it literally or metaphorically, this lecture will examine the concept of walking in the works of one of the key authors in British literature, Jane Austen. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.relation.ispartofseries University of Cape Town Summer School 2014 en_ZA
dc.rights Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International en_ZA
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en_ZA
dc.subject jane austen en_ZA
dc.subject walking in literature en_ZA
dc.subject british literature en_ZA
dc.title Walking into Words: selected British writers en_ZA
dc.type Other en_ZA
uct.type.publication Teaching and Learning en_ZA
uct.type.resource Recorded lecture en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
uct.type.filetype
uct.type.filetype Image


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