The judiciary and government

 

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dc.contributor Jara, Mazibuko
dc.contributor Ampofo-Anti, Okyerebea
dc.contributor.author Davis, Dennis
dc.contributor.author Le Roux, Michelle
dc.date 2012-02
dc.date.accessioned 2014-09-23T01:09:25Z
dc.date.available 2014-09-23T01:09:25Z
dc.date.issued 2014-09-23
dc.identifier.citation Davis, D., Le Roux, M. 2014-09-23. The judiciary and government. Recorded lecture. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/7650
dc.description.abstract This lecture series will be of interest to law students, legal practitioners and others in fields related to human rights, freedom of information and the reform and redistribution of land. Lecture series coordinated by Judge Dennis Davis, Judge of the High Court of South Africa & Michelle le Roux, Advocate of the High Court and Senior Visiting Fellow, Mandela Institute, Wits Law School. Tension between the elected government and the judiciary is common in constitutional democracies which feature the separation of powers between the judiciary, executive and legislature. However, in South Africa, concerns about excessive judicial intervention in politics and the unsuitability of our constitution to the social and economic developmental needs of the country have increasingly become more vocal. This lecture series will consider the role of the judiciary in our developing country as it strives to embed constitutional democracy. It will look at the dangers of judicial over- or under-reach and the possible threats to and opportunities for our constitutional model. Two panel discussions will focus on recent challenges related to land reform and information freedom respectively. LECTURE TITLES: *1. The good, bad and ugly: models of constitutional adjudication - Michelle le Roux; *2. How have we done? An examination of court success and failure through key cases - Judge Dennis Davis; *3. Panel on slow land reform and redistribution: the challenge to align the constitution - Mazibuko Jara (Law, Race & Gender Research Unit, UCT); *4. Panel on media and information freedoms under threat - Okyerebea Ampofo-Anti; *5. How concerned should we be about our constitutional health? - Judge Dennis Davis & Michelle le Roux. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.rights Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International en_ZA
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/ en_ZA
dc.subject constitution en_ZA
dc.subject democracy en_ZA
dc.subject information freedom en_ZA
dc.subject judicial intervention en_ZA
dc.subject land reform en_ZA
dc.subject law en_ZA
dc.subject media en_ZA
dc.subject politics en_ZA
dc.title The judiciary and government en_ZA
dc.type Other en_ZA
uct.type.publication Teaching and Learning en_ZA
uct.type.resource Recorded lecture en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
uct.type.filetype
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation 2014. <i>The judiciary and government.</i> http://hdl.handle.net/11427/7650 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation . 2014. <i>The judiciary and government.</i> http://hdl.handle.net/11427/7650 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation . 2014. <i>The judiciary and government.</i> http://hdl.handle.net/11427/7650 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Other AU - Davis, Dennis AU - Le Roux, Michelle AB - This lecture series will be of interest to law students, legal practitioners and others in fields related to human rights, freedom of information and the reform and redistribution of land. Lecture series coordinated by Judge Dennis Davis, Judge of the High Court of South Africa & Michelle le Roux, Advocate of the High Court and Senior Visiting Fellow, Mandela Institute, Wits Law School. Tension between the elected government and the judiciary is common in constitutional democracies which feature the separation of powers between the judiciary, executive and legislature. However, in South Africa, concerns about excessive judicial intervention in politics and the unsuitability of our constitution to the social and economic developmental needs of the country have increasingly become more vocal. This lecture series will consider the role of the judiciary in our developing country as it strives to embed constitutional democracy. It will look at the dangers of judicial over- or under-reach and the possible threats to and opportunities for our constitutional model. Two panel discussions will focus on recent challenges related to land reform and information freedom respectively. LECTURE TITLES: *1. The good, bad and ugly: models of constitutional adjudication - Michelle le Roux; *2. How have we done? An examination of court success and failure through key cases - Judge Dennis Davis; *3. Panel on slow land reform and redistribution: the challenge to align the constitution - Mazibuko Jara (Law, Race & Gender Research Unit, UCT); *4. Panel on media and information freedoms under threat - Okyerebea Ampofo-Anti; *5. How concerned should we be about our constitutional health? - Judge Dennis Davis & Michelle le Roux. DA - 2014-09-23 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town KW - constitution KW - democracy KW - information freedom KW - judicial intervention KW - land reform KW - law KW - media KW - politics LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2014 T1 - The judiciary and government TI - The judiciary and government UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/7650 ER - en_ZA


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