Can stable isotopes and radiocarbon dating provide a forensic solution for curbing illegal harvesting of threatened cycads?

 

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dc.contributor.author Retief, Kirsten
dc.contributor.author West, Adam G.
dc.contributor.author Pfab, Michele F.
dc.coverage.spatial South Africa en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-09-17T11:40:03Z
dc.date.available 2014-09-17T11:40:03Z
dc.date.issued 2014-09-17
dc.identifier.citation Retief, K., West, A.G. and Pfab, M.F. (2014) Can stable isotopes and radiocarbon dating provide a forensic solution for curbing illegal harvesting of threatened cycads? Journal of Forensic Sciences. DOI: 10.111/1556-4029.12644 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/7508
dc.description.abstract Cycads in South Africa are facing an extinction crisis due to the illegal extraction of plants from the wild. Proving wild origin of suspect ex situ cycads to the satisfaction of a court of law is difficult, limiting law enforcement efforts. We investigated the feasibility of using multiple stable isotopes to identify specimens removed from the wild. Relocated and wild specimens from the African genus Encephalartos were sampled: E. lebomboensis and E. arenarius. 14C analysis indicated that a ±30 year chronology could be reliably obtained from the cycads. For E. arenarius, pre-relocation tissue was consistent with a wild origin, whereas tissue grown post-relocation was isotopically distinct from the wild for 87Sr/86Sr and δ15N. For E. lebomboensis, δ34S, δ18O and 87Sr/86Sr were different between relocated and control plants, consistent with the >30 years since relocation. Our findings demonstrate the potential for a forensic isotope approach to identify illegal ex situ cycads. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.publisher Wiley en_ZA
dc.rights Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ *
dc.source Journal of Forensic Sciences en_ZA
dc.title Can stable isotopes and radiocarbon dating provide a forensic solution for curbing illegal harvesting of threatened cycads? en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Post-print en_ZA
uct.subject.keywords stable isotopes en_ZA
uct.subject.keywords conservation en_ZA
uct.subject.keywords cycads en_ZA
uct.subject.keywords forensics en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Biological Sciences en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Retief, K., West, Adam G., & Pfab, Michele F. (2014). Can stable isotopes and radiocarbon dating provide a forensic solution for curbing illegal harvesting of threatened cycads?. <i>Journal of Forensic Sciences</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/7508 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Retief, Kirsten, Adam G. West, and Michele F. Pfab "Can stable isotopes and radiocarbon dating provide a forensic solution for curbing illegal harvesting of threatened cycads?." <i>Journal of Forensic Sciences</i> (2014) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/7508 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Retief K, West Adam G, Pfab Michele F. Can stable isotopes and radiocarbon dating provide a forensic solution for curbing illegal harvesting of threatened cycads?. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 2014; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/7508. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Retief, Kirsten AU - West, Adam G. AU - Pfab, Michele F. AB - Cycads in South Africa are facing an extinction crisis due to the illegal extraction of plants from the wild. Proving wild origin of suspect ex situ cycads to the satisfaction of a court of law is difficult, limiting law enforcement efforts. We investigated the feasibility of using multiple stable isotopes to identify specimens removed from the wild. Relocated and wild specimens from the African genus Encephalartos were sampled: E. lebomboensis and E. arenarius. 14C analysis indicated that a ±30 year chronology could be reliably obtained from the cycads. For E. arenarius, pre-relocation tissue was consistent with a wild origin, whereas tissue grown post-relocation was isotopically distinct from the wild for 87Sr/86Sr and δ15N. For E. lebomboensis, δ34S, δ18O and 87Sr/86Sr were different between relocated and control plants, consistent with the >30 years since relocation. Our findings demonstrate the potential for a forensic isotope approach to identify illegal ex situ cycads. DA - 2014-09-17 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - Journal of Forensic Sciences LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2014 T1 - Can stable isotopes and radiocarbon dating provide a forensic solution for curbing illegal harvesting of threatened cycads? TI - Can stable isotopes and radiocarbon dating provide a forensic solution for curbing illegal harvesting of threatened cycads? UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/7508 ER - en_ZA


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