Using programming tools in virtual environments

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Marsden, Gary en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Yang, Shih-min en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-09-10T12:36:27Z
dc.date.available 2014-09-10T12:36:27Z
dc.date.issued 2002 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Yang, S. 2002. Using programming tools in virtual environments. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/7414
dc.description Bibliography: leaves 108-115. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Presence is the sense of being in the computer-generated environment. It is regarded as the key to understanding the success of a virtual environment. In this research we focus on desktop virtual environment authoring tools. We believe that presence is also important in authoring tools because with greater presence, people can enjoy the process of building virtual environments and increase the task performance. The type of desktop virtual environment authoring tool we are interested in is represented best by Alice. It allows novice users, who do not have knowledge of computing, to create virtual environments. We have identified some problems in Alice with respect to presence and human-computer interaction. In this dissertation, we built four virtual environment prototypes with three different interaction methods. The three interactions were: the conventional interaction method; the “tool approach” and the “pin approach"". These four prototypes were used in two experiments. In the first (presence) experiment, we investigated whether the sense of presence can be maintained with our novel interaction method. We hypothesised that the level of presence should be higher in the tool approach prototype than that in the conventional approach prototype. However, we found no difference between the mean of the presence scores in the two systems, although the presence generated in the tool approach prototype was slightly greater than in the conventional approach prototype. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Computer Science en_ZA
dc.title Using programming tools in virtual environments en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Computer Science en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MSc en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Yang, S. (2002). <i>Using programming tools in virtual environments</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Computer Science. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/7414 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Yang, Shih-min. <i>"Using programming tools in virtual environments."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Computer Science, 2002. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/7414 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Yang S. Using programming tools in virtual environments. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Computer Science, 2002 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/7414 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Yang, Shih-min AB - Presence is the sense of being in the computer-generated environment. It is regarded as the key to understanding the success of a virtual environment. In this research we focus on desktop virtual environment authoring tools. We believe that presence is also important in authoring tools because with greater presence, people can enjoy the process of building virtual environments and increase the task performance. The type of desktop virtual environment authoring tool we are interested in is represented best by Alice. It allows novice users, who do not have knowledge of computing, to create virtual environments. We have identified some problems in Alice with respect to presence and human-computer interaction. In this dissertation, we built four virtual environment prototypes with three different interaction methods. The three interactions were: the conventional interaction method; the “tool approach” and the “pin approach"". These four prototypes were used in two experiments. In the first (presence) experiment, we investigated whether the sense of presence can be maintained with our novel interaction method. We hypothesised that the level of presence should be higher in the tool approach prototype than that in the conventional approach prototype. However, we found no difference between the mean of the presence scores in the two systems, although the presence generated in the tool approach prototype was slightly greater than in the conventional approach prototype. DA - 2002 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2002 T1 - Using programming tools in virtual environments TI - Using programming tools in virtual environments UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/7414 ER - en_ZA


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