Investigating the effect of depression, stress, and attachment style on leftward cradling bias.

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Malcolm-Smith, Susan en_ZA
dc.contributor.author McGrath, Margaret J en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-09-02T10:01:07Z
dc.date.available 2014-09-02T10:01:07Z
dc.date.issued 2013 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation McGrath, M. 2013. Investigating the effect of depression, stress, and attachment style on leftward cradling bias. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6850
dc.description.abstract The majority of women cradle infants to the left of their midline ? this phenomenon is known as leftward cradling bias. The right hemisphere's specialization for emotional processing is believed to explain the bias as it would facilitate emotional communication between the parent and child. Thus, it is of scientific and clinical interest to investigate the disruptors of leftward cradling bias. This study examined three possible disruptors of leftward cradling: stress, depression and attachment style. In total, after exclusion criteria were applied, 468 female students participated. Information was collected over the internet via surveys and using an imaginary cradling task, to facilitate obtaining a large sample. A hierarchical regression model was developed to concurrently examine the effect of depression, stress, and attachment style on leftward cradling bias. The hierarchical regression model was not statistically significant;; however, four points of interest were found in the data. First, depression was a significant predictor of reduced leftward cradling bias. This supports the findings of previous studies that depression disrupts leftward cradling bias (Alzahrani, 2012; Scola, Arciszewski, Measelle, & Vauclair, 2013; Vauclair & Scola, 2009; Weatherill et al., 2004). Second, stress was not a statistically significant predictor of reduced leftward cradling bias. This was surprising as stress has been shown to disrupt leftward cradling bias in the literature (Alzahrani, 2012;; Reissland, Hopkins, Helms, & Williams, 2009; Suter, Huggenberger, Blumenthal, & Schachinger, 2011; Suter, Huggenberger, & Schächinger, 2007). This lack of significance was attributed to the measure of daily stress used, indicating that future research should concentrate on major life stressors. Third, depression and stress were significantly correlated with each other. Thus, future research should take into account the interaction between them. Fourth, attachment style was not a significant predictor of reduced leftward cradling bias. However, it had a statistically significant correlation with depression and stress, which are connected to disrupted leftward cradling bias. Thus, the role between depression, stress, attachment style should be further explored. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.title Investigating the effect of depression, stress, and attachment style on leftward cradling bias. en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Psychology en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation McGrath, M. J. (2013). <i>Investigating the effect of depression, stress, and attachment style on leftward cradling bias</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Psychology. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6850 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation McGrath, Margaret J. <i>"Investigating the effect of depression, stress, and attachment style on leftward cradling bias."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Psychology, 2013. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6850 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation McGrath MJ. Investigating the effect of depression, stress, and attachment style on leftward cradling bias. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Psychology, 2013 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6850 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - McGrath, Margaret J AB - The majority of women cradle infants to the left of their midline ? this phenomenon is known as leftward cradling bias. The right hemisphere's specialization for emotional processing is believed to explain the bias as it would facilitate emotional communication between the parent and child. Thus, it is of scientific and clinical interest to investigate the disruptors of leftward cradling bias. This study examined three possible disruptors of leftward cradling: stress, depression and attachment style. In total, after exclusion criteria were applied, 468 female students participated. Information was collected over the internet via surveys and using an imaginary cradling task, to facilitate obtaining a large sample. A hierarchical regression model was developed to concurrently examine the effect of depression, stress, and attachment style on leftward cradling bias. The hierarchical regression model was not statistically significant;; however, four points of interest were found in the data. First, depression was a significant predictor of reduced leftward cradling bias. This supports the findings of previous studies that depression disrupts leftward cradling bias (Alzahrani, 2012; Scola, Arciszewski, Measelle, & Vauclair, 2013; Vauclair & Scola, 2009; Weatherill et al., 2004). Second, stress was not a statistically significant predictor of reduced leftward cradling bias. This was surprising as stress has been shown to disrupt leftward cradling bias in the literature (Alzahrani, 2012;; Reissland, Hopkins, Helms, & Williams, 2009; Suter, Huggenberger, Blumenthal, & Schachinger, 2011; Suter, Huggenberger, & Schächinger, 2007). This lack of significance was attributed to the measure of daily stress used, indicating that future research should concentrate on major life stressors. Third, depression and stress were significantly correlated with each other. Thus, future research should take into account the interaction between them. Fourth, attachment style was not a significant predictor of reduced leftward cradling bias. However, it had a statistically significant correlation with depression and stress, which are connected to disrupted leftward cradling bias. Thus, the role between depression, stress, attachment style should be further explored. DA - 2013 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2013 T1 - Investigating the effect of depression, stress, and attachment style on leftward cradling bias TI - Investigating the effect of depression, stress, and attachment style on leftward cradling bias UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6850 ER - en_ZA


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