Black women in post-apartheid South Africa, nation-building and radio: the case of Ukhozi FM

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Adams, Zuleiga en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Nkosi, Lethiwe en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-09-02T09:42:28Z
dc.date.available 2014-09-02T09:42:28Z
dc.date.issued 2014 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Nkosi, L. 2014. Black women in post-apartheid South Africa, nation-building and radio: the case of Ukhozi FM. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6788
dc.description.abstract Nation-building as it relates to the notion of belonging, is a pertinent topic in post-apartheid South Africa. This is primarily because of the prevailing discourse about nation and belonging in apartheid South Africa, whereby citizenship to large sections of the population was on the basis of skin colour. In its hierarchical definition of citizenship and belonging, black women were on the bottom of the rung. This denial was reinforced through the content that was broadcast on national media. This changed with the advent of constitutional democracy. During the transition period from apartheid, the national media sought to convey messages that portrayed a nation characterised by equality and inclusivity. This minor dissertation is concerned with the extent to which the content broadcast on a radio programme engages black female listeners as citizens. It specifically focuses on the content broadcast on Jabul Ujule (Be Happy and Be Content): a programme on Ukhozi FM. By way of background, it sketches a brief history of how radio was used by both the colonial and apartheid government to 'imagine' South Africa as well as construct a particular kind of public sphere. Following upon this, the dissertation locates Ukhozi FM's history within the continuum that begins with the apartheid era and extends to the post-apartheid period and discusses the station's role during both eras, focusing more fully on the latter period. In short, this minor dissertation looks at the history of Jabul Ujule in terms of the content that was broadcast during the apartheid era in order to understand the way in which black women were and are being engaged in the post-apartheid era. Methodologically, it uses discourse analysis to analyse transcripts of the broadcasts as well as a transcript of an interview with the presenter of the programme. Lastly, this work looks at how the infusion of advertisement into the programme's content limits the extent to which the content engages its female listeners as citizens. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.title Black women in post-apartheid South Africa, nation-building and radio: the case of Ukhozi FM en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department African Studies en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MPhil en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Nkosi, L. (2014). <i>Black women in post-apartheid South Africa, nation-building and radio: the case of Ukhozi FM</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,African Studies. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6788 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Nkosi, Lethiwe. <i>"Black women in post-apartheid South Africa, nation-building and radio: the case of Ukhozi FM."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,African Studies, 2014. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6788 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Nkosi L. Black women in post-apartheid South Africa, nation-building and radio: the case of Ukhozi FM. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,African Studies, 2014 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6788 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Nkosi, Lethiwe AB - Nation-building as it relates to the notion of belonging, is a pertinent topic in post-apartheid South Africa. This is primarily because of the prevailing discourse about nation and belonging in apartheid South Africa, whereby citizenship to large sections of the population was on the basis of skin colour. In its hierarchical definition of citizenship and belonging, black women were on the bottom of the rung. This denial was reinforced through the content that was broadcast on national media. This changed with the advent of constitutional democracy. During the transition period from apartheid, the national media sought to convey messages that portrayed a nation characterised by equality and inclusivity. This minor dissertation is concerned with the extent to which the content broadcast on a radio programme engages black female listeners as citizens. It specifically focuses on the content broadcast on Jabul Ujule (Be Happy and Be Content): a programme on Ukhozi FM. By way of background, it sketches a brief history of how radio was used by both the colonial and apartheid government to 'imagine' South Africa as well as construct a particular kind of public sphere. Following upon this, the dissertation locates Ukhozi FM's history within the continuum that begins with the apartheid era and extends to the post-apartheid period and discusses the station's role during both eras, focusing more fully on the latter period. In short, this minor dissertation looks at the history of Jabul Ujule in terms of the content that was broadcast during the apartheid era in order to understand the way in which black women were and are being engaged in the post-apartheid era. Methodologically, it uses discourse analysis to analyse transcripts of the broadcasts as well as a transcript of an interview with the presenter of the programme. Lastly, this work looks at how the infusion of advertisement into the programme's content limits the extent to which the content engages its female listeners as citizens. DA - 2014 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2014 T1 - Black women in post-apartheid South Africa, nation-building and radio: the case of Ukhozi FM TI - Black women in post-apartheid South Africa, nation-building and radio: the case of Ukhozi FM UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6788 ER - en_ZA


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