International Environmental Justice and the Climate Change Challenge

 

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dc.contributor.advisor
dc.contributor.author Lawhon, Mary
dc.contributor.author Ziervogel, Gina
dc.date 2011-12
dc.date.accessioned 2014-08-20T15:53:32Z
dc.date.available 2014-08-20T15:53:32Z
dc.date.issued 2012-12
dc.identifier.citation Lawhon, M., Ziervogel, G. 2012-12. International Environmental Justice and the Climate Change Challenge. Web page. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6611
dc.identifier.uri https://vula.uct.ac.za/access/content/group/bb3108d0-faf2-4c1e-a259-461161d2ea41/International%20Environmental%20Justice%20and%20the%20Climate%20Change%20Challenge/LawhonEGS1003%20course%20summary.htm
dc.identifier.uri
dc.description.abstract This course module is one section of a larger course called Geography, Development and Environment that runs as a first year course in the Department of Environmental and Geographical Science at the University of Cape Town. The course work provided here is one of 3 modules including 1) the global economic environment, 2) regional dynamics of development, and 3) the North-South debates on environmental problems. This module falls under the theme of North-South debates on environmental problems. The courses use theories of underdevelopment and climatic change to explain global and regional inequalities and environmental problems. Key concepts in the course are: trade, foreign aid, regional integration, and climatic change. The objectives of this section of the course are to begin understanding: 1. the concepts of environmental justice and climate change, 2. the relationship between environmental change and development, and 3. the international politics of global environmental change, This topic provides the scope for debate among students because of the contentious nature of the subject, and the lack of clear answers. Importantly this course focuses on presenting multiple explanations and diverse viewpoints and is intended to provide context, history and structure for students’ thinking. Students are not provided with solutions, but instead encouraged to develop their own explanations and responses to climate change and justice. This 4 week module, supported by powerpoint slides, uses climate change to explore key environmental and geographical issues including: justice, scale, international equality, global political processes, and environmental change. We begin by examining the foundation and principles of the environmental movement, distinguishing between different types of environmentalism and articulating early environmental conflicts between the North and South (presentations 1, 2, 4). We then develop ideas of environmental justice (presentation 3) and how it applies to climate change. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.rights Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ *
dc.subject climate change en_ZA
dc.subject environment en_ZA
dc.subject geography en_ZA
dc.subject south africa en_ZA
dc.subject environmental history en_ZA
dc.subject adaptation to climate change en_ZA
dc.subject mitigation en_ZA
dc.subject carbon trading en_ZA
dc.subject environmental conflicts en_ZA
dc.title International Environmental Justice and the Climate Change Challenge en_ZA
dc.type Other en_ZA
uct.type.publication Teaching and Learning en_ZA
uct.type.resource Web page en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Environmental and Geographical Science en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation 2012. <i>International Environmental Justice and the Climate Change Challenge.</i> http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6611 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation . 2012. <i>International Environmental Justice and the Climate Change Challenge.</i> http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6611 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation . 2012. <i>International Environmental Justice and the Climate Change Challenge.</i> http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6611 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Other AU - Lawhon, Mary AU - Ziervogel, Gina AB - This course module is one section of a larger course called Geography, Development and Environment that runs as a first year course in the Department of Environmental and Geographical Science at the University of Cape Town. The course work provided here is one of 3 modules including 1) the global economic environment, 2) regional dynamics of development, and 3) the North-South debates on environmental problems. This module falls under the theme of North-South debates on environmental problems. The courses use theories of underdevelopment and climatic change to explain global and regional inequalities and environmental problems. Key concepts in the course are: trade, foreign aid, regional integration, and climatic change. The objectives of this section of the course are to begin understanding: 1. the concepts of environmental justice and climate change, 2. the relationship between environmental change and development, and 3. the international politics of global environmental change, This topic provides the scope for debate among students because of the contentious nature of the subject, and the lack of clear answers. Importantly this course focuses on presenting multiple explanations and diverse viewpoints and is intended to provide context, history and structure for students’ thinking. Students are not provided with solutions, but instead encouraged to develop their own explanations and responses to climate change and justice. This 4 week module, supported by powerpoint slides, uses climate change to explore key environmental and geographical issues including: justice, scale, international equality, global political processes, and environmental change. We begin by examining the foundation and principles of the environmental movement, distinguishing between different types of environmentalism and articulating early environmental conflicts between the North and South (presentations 1, 2, 4). We then develop ideas of environmental justice (presentation 3) and how it applies to climate change. DA - 2012-12 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town KW - climate change KW - environment KW - geography KW - south africa KW - environmental history KW - adaptation to climate change KW - mitigation KW - carbon trading KW - environmental conflicts LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2012 T1 - International Environmental Justice and the Climate Change Challenge TI - International Environmental Justice and the Climate Change Challenge UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6611 ER - en_ZA


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