Problem Solving Discourse Models: Informing an Introductory Engineering Course

 

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dc.contributor.author Collier-Reed, Brandon I
dc.contributor.author Wolmarans, Nicky
dc.date.accessioned 2014-08-18T08:46:13Z
dc.date.available 2014-08-18T08:46:13Z
dc.date.issued 2010
dc.identifier.citation Wolmarans, N., & Collier-Reed, B. I. (2010). Problem Solving Discourse Models: Informing an Introductory Engineering Course. African Journal of Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education, 14(2), 28-41. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 1028-8457 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6592
dc.description This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published in African Journal of Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education on 20 Aug 2013, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/10288457.2010.10740680.
dc.description.abstract This article draws on Gee’s notions of Discourse and specifically Discourse Models to explore Engineering Problem Solving and the different ways in which it can be understood in an engineering context. After Gee we attempt to identify aspects of doing, being and valuing that underpin people’s Problem Solving Discourse Models. Interviews with three engineering lecturers reveal that they draw extensively on two different Discourse Models of Engineering Problem Solving. The more highly valued Model (Integrated Design Model) reflects engineering practice, is located in engineering design and dependant on judgement. The other is located in the classroom and involves the algorithmic resolution of mathematical models, (Knowledge Construction Model). These Discourse Models form a backdrop to interviews with three students entering an engineering degree programme for the first time. The three students each draw different Discourse Models of Problem Solving, and display characteristics (such as the level of confidence) that align more or less with Engineering Problem Solving, sometimes obscuring their understanding. The implications of these findings in terms of an introductory engineering course are discussed. These include recognising the potential diversity of Problem Solving Discourse Models our students bring to tertiary education, as well as the difficulty of introducing a legitimate design project requiring the level of judgement needed to interpret open-ended, ill-defined problems and then integrate multiple quantitative models with multidisciplinary qualitative judgements in a rigorous manner. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.publisher Taylor & Francis (Routledge) en_ZA
dc.rights Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ *
dc.source African Journal of Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/10288457.2010.10740680
dc.title Problem Solving Discourse Models: Informing an Introductory Engineering Course en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
uct.subject.keywords Problem Solving en_ZA
uct.subject.keywords Design en_ZA
uct.subject.keywords Discourse Models en_ZA
uct.subject.keywords First Year Engineering Course en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment
dc.publisher.department Department of Mechanical Engineering en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
dc.identifier.apacitation Collier-Reed, B. I., & Wolmarans, N. (2010). Problem Solving Discourse Models: Informing an Introductory Engineering Course. <i>African Journal of Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6592 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Collier-Reed, Brandon I, and Nicky Wolmarans "Problem Solving Discourse Models: Informing an Introductory Engineering Course." <i>African Journal of Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education</i> (2010) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6592 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Collier-Reed BI, Wolmarans N. Problem Solving Discourse Models: Informing an Introductory Engineering Course. African Journal of Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education. 2010; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6592. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Collier-Reed, Brandon I AU - Wolmarans, Nicky AB - This article draws on Gee’s notions of Discourse and specifically Discourse Models to explore Engineering Problem Solving and the different ways in which it can be understood in an engineering context. After Gee we attempt to identify aspects of doing, being and valuing that underpin people’s Problem Solving Discourse Models. Interviews with three engineering lecturers reveal that they draw extensively on two different Discourse Models of Engineering Problem Solving. The more highly valued Model (Integrated Design Model) reflects engineering practice, is located in engineering design and dependant on judgement. The other is located in the classroom and involves the algorithmic resolution of mathematical models, (Knowledge Construction Model). These Discourse Models form a backdrop to interviews with three students entering an engineering degree programme for the first time. The three students each draw different Discourse Models of Problem Solving, and display characteristics (such as the level of confidence) that align more or less with Engineering Problem Solving, sometimes obscuring their understanding. The implications of these findings in terms of an introductory engineering course are discussed. These include recognising the potential diversity of Problem Solving Discourse Models our students bring to tertiary education, as well as the difficulty of introducing a legitimate design project requiring the level of judgement needed to interpret open-ended, ill-defined problems and then integrate multiple quantitative models with multidisciplinary qualitative judgements in a rigorous manner. DA - 2010 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - African Journal of Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2010 SM - 1028-8457 T1 - Problem Solving Discourse Models: Informing an Introductory Engineering Course TI - Problem Solving Discourse Models: Informing an Introductory Engineering Course UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6592 ER - en_ZA


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