Design, synthesis and evaluation of potential dual drugs targeting the haemoglobin degradation pathway in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Chibale, Kelly en_ZA
dc.contributor.author October, Natasha en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-08-13T14:28:56Z
dc.date.available 2014-08-13T14:28:56Z
dc.date.issued 2006 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation October, N. 2006. Design, synthesis and evaluation of potential dual drugs targeting the haemoglobin degradation pathway in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6353
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract For many years malaria has been a major cause of human suffering. Despite significant advances in understanding the disease and the parasite, malaria still remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the tropics. Approximately 500 million people are afflicted and almost 3 million people die from the disease annually. Of the four causative species, Plasmodium falciparum is the most lethal. Recent trends indicate rapid emergence of drug-resistent and more virulent strains of the parasite to further intensify the problem. The choice of therapies currently available for the treatment of malaria is highly limited, and several of these may eventually be lost or compromised due to drug resistance. New antimalarial drugs with proven clinical efficacy against current drug-resistance cases of malaria including Plasmodium falciparum infections is critical to combact the disease and cope with the problem of further development or resistance. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Chemistry en_ZA
dc.title Design, synthesis and evaluation of potential dual drugs targeting the haemoglobin degradation pathway in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Chemistry en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation October, N. (2006). <i>Design, synthesis and evaluation of potential dual drugs targeting the haemoglobin degradation pathway in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Chemistry. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6353 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation October, Natasha. <i>"Design, synthesis and evaluation of potential dual drugs targeting the haemoglobin degradation pathway in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Chemistry, 2006. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6353 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation October N. Design, synthesis and evaluation of potential dual drugs targeting the haemoglobin degradation pathway in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Chemistry, 2006 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6353 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - October, Natasha AB - For many years malaria has been a major cause of human suffering. Despite significant advances in understanding the disease and the parasite, malaria still remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the tropics. Approximately 500 million people are afflicted and almost 3 million people die from the disease annually. Of the four causative species, Plasmodium falciparum is the most lethal. Recent trends indicate rapid emergence of drug-resistent and more virulent strains of the parasite to further intensify the problem. The choice of therapies currently available for the treatment of malaria is highly limited, and several of these may eventually be lost or compromised due to drug resistance. New antimalarial drugs with proven clinical efficacy against current drug-resistance cases of malaria including Plasmodium falciparum infections is critical to combact the disease and cope with the problem of further development or resistance. DA - 2006 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2006 T1 - Design, synthesis and evaluation of potential dual drugs targeting the haemoglobin degradation pathway in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum TI - Design, synthesis and evaluation of potential dual drugs targeting the haemoglobin degradation pathway in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6353 ER - en_ZA


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