Forest colonization of savannas : patterns and process

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Bond, William J en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Craine, Joseph M en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Khavhagali, Vhalinavho Patterson en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-08-13T14:04:21Z
dc.date.available 2014-08-13T14:04:21Z
dc.date.issued 2008 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Khavhagali, V. 2008. Forest colonization of savannas : patterns and process. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6110
dc.description Includes abstract. en_ZA
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 95-102). en_ZA
dc.description.abstract In this study, I explored factors that influence forest colonization in a South African savanna. I used a 50 year fire experiment in the Kruger National Park to explore patterns of forest colonization in a mesic Terminalia sericea savanna. I studied woody seedling and sapling distribution in relation to different burning treatments, including no burning, and microsite position - in the open or under the canopy of tall trees. The study showed that species richness and abundance was greatest under Sclerocarya birrea, low under Terminalia sericea and lowest in the open habitats. Low fire frequency increased species richness and abundance under S. biirea, but not under T. sericea or the open habitats. Fire sensitive or fire-intolerant species were highest under tree canopies on unburnt and triennial burn plots, whereas frequently burnt (annual or biennial) plots, had fire tolerant and typical savanna species. Frequent burning reduced woody plant biomass by killing seedlings, saplings and adult trees. Fire exclusion led to a higher seedling and sapling recruitment under S. birrea and T. sericea than open habitats. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Botany en_ZA
dc.title Forest colonization of savannas : patterns and process en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Biological Sciences en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MSc en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Khavhagali, V. P. (2008). <i>Forest colonization of savannas : patterns and process</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6110 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Khavhagali, Vhalinavho Patterson. <i>"Forest colonization of savannas : patterns and process."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 2008. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6110 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Khavhagali VP. Forest colonization of savannas : patterns and process. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 2008 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6110 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Khavhagali, Vhalinavho Patterson AB - In this study, I explored factors that influence forest colonization in a South African savanna. I used a 50 year fire experiment in the Kruger National Park to explore patterns of forest colonization in a mesic Terminalia sericea savanna. I studied woody seedling and sapling distribution in relation to different burning treatments, including no burning, and microsite position - in the open or under the canopy of tall trees. The study showed that species richness and abundance was greatest under Sclerocarya birrea, low under Terminalia sericea and lowest in the open habitats. Low fire frequency increased species richness and abundance under S. biirea, but not under T. sericea or the open habitats. Fire sensitive or fire-intolerant species were highest under tree canopies on unburnt and triennial burn plots, whereas frequently burnt (annual or biennial) plots, had fire tolerant and typical savanna species. Frequent burning reduced woody plant biomass by killing seedlings, saplings and adult trees. Fire exclusion led to a higher seedling and sapling recruitment under S. birrea and T. sericea than open habitats. DA - 2008 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2008 T1 - Forest colonization of savannas : patterns and process TI - Forest colonization of savannas : patterns and process UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6110 ER - en_ZA


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