Surgical restoration of maxillofacial defects by transport disc distraction osteogenesis : engineering aspects

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Vicatos, George en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Boonzaaier, James Angus en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-07-31T11:29:48Z
dc.date.available 2014-07-31T11:29:48Z
dc.date.issued 2013 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Boonzaaier, J. 2013. Surgical restoration of maxillofacial defects by transport disc distraction osteogenesis : engineering aspects. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/5561
dc.description Includes abstract.
dc.description Includes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstract Transport disc distraction osteogenesis (TDDO) harnesses the natural healing mechanisms of bone to regenerate, and thus repairs, bone defects. Presently, no system is available for applying TDDO to the maxillary anatomy; specifically anterior-to-posterior distraction on a three-dimensional curvilinear vector. The objective of this study was to devise a system to enable repair of the defective maxilla. The mechanical and ergonomic requirements of treatment by TDDO were investigated in the literature and through consultation with experts in the medical and bio-medical engineering fields. These requirements were distilled into a definitive Product Requirement Specification. Three iterative versions of the device were manufactured and tested. After satisfying the functional requirements in bench-tests, each version of the device was evaluated clinically. The operational performance of each device directed refinement of subsequent versions, directing major improvements to ease-of-use and comfort. The project culminated in a fully-functional maxillary TDDO device that addresses the requirements of both surgeon and patient. Proven in practice, the prototype can be easily and accurately customised by the surgeon to suit a wide range of defective maxillofacial geometries. The current version of the device performed successfully in bench-testing, confirming the strength of critical features and demonstrating the presence of adequate safety factors. The current version of the device has been implemented in two clinical cases where it successfully facilitated the repair of substantialdefects of the maxillary alveolus and hard palate. In total, four patients with large maxillary defects were treated with successful outcomes using devices developed in this project. One case has reached completion, with structural restoration of the maxillary alveolus and hard palate, and supporting permanent implanted dentition. Three ongoing cases are awaiting consolidation of the bone regenerate before final dental rehabilitation can commence. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Mechanical Engineering en_ZA
dc.title Surgical restoration of maxillofacial defects by transport disc distraction osteogenesis : engineering aspects en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment
dc.publisher.department Department of Mechanical Engineering en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MSc en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Boonzaaier, J. A. (2013). <i>Surgical restoration of maxillofacial defects by transport disc distraction osteogenesis : engineering aspects</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Mechanical Engineering. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/5561 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Boonzaaier, James Angus. <i>"Surgical restoration of maxillofacial defects by transport disc distraction osteogenesis : engineering aspects."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2013. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/5561 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Boonzaaier JA. Surgical restoration of maxillofacial defects by transport disc distraction osteogenesis : engineering aspects. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2013 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/5561 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Boonzaaier, James Angus AB - Transport disc distraction osteogenesis (TDDO) harnesses the natural healing mechanisms of bone to regenerate, and thus repairs, bone defects. Presently, no system is available for applying TDDO to the maxillary anatomy; specifically anterior-to-posterior distraction on a three-dimensional curvilinear vector. The objective of this study was to devise a system to enable repair of the defective maxilla. The mechanical and ergonomic requirements of treatment by TDDO were investigated in the literature and through consultation with experts in the medical and bio-medical engineering fields. These requirements were distilled into a definitive Product Requirement Specification. Three iterative versions of the device were manufactured and tested. After satisfying the functional requirements in bench-tests, each version of the device was evaluated clinically. The operational performance of each device directed refinement of subsequent versions, directing major improvements to ease-of-use and comfort. The project culminated in a fully-functional maxillary TDDO device that addresses the requirements of both surgeon and patient. Proven in practice, the prototype can be easily and accurately customised by the surgeon to suit a wide range of defective maxillofacial geometries. The current version of the device performed successfully in bench-testing, confirming the strength of critical features and demonstrating the presence of adequate safety factors. The current version of the device has been implemented in two clinical cases where it successfully facilitated the repair of substantialdefects of the maxillary alveolus and hard palate. In total, four patients with large maxillary defects were treated with successful outcomes using devices developed in this project. One case has reached completion, with structural restoration of the maxillary alveolus and hard palate, and supporting permanent implanted dentition. Three ongoing cases are awaiting consolidation of the bone regenerate before final dental rehabilitation can commence. DA - 2013 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2013 T1 - Surgical restoration of maxillofacial defects by transport disc distraction osteogenesis : engineering aspects TI - Surgical restoration of maxillofacial defects by transport disc distraction osteogenesis : engineering aspects UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/5561 ER - en_ZA


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