An investigation into the reduction of road safety risk in Cape Town through the use of microscopic simulation modelling : a vehicle-pedestrian and infrastructure interaction assessment

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Vanderschuren, Marianne en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Jobanputra, Rahul en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-07-31T10:28:22Z
dc.date.available 2014-07-31T10:28:22Z
dc.date.issued 2013 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Jobanputra, R. 2013. An investigation into the reduction of road safety risk in Cape Town through the use of microscopic simulation modelling : a vehicle-pedestrian and infrastructure interaction assessment. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/5037
dc.description Includes abstract.
dc.description Includes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstract The record of road traffic fatalities in South Africa at around 15,000 per year has continued unabated over the last decade and has led to South African cities consistently featuring at the top of the list of worst known locations for road fatalities around the world. Worryingly, these statistics show that more than half of these fatalities are pedestrians. With the increasing rates of urbanisation and motorisation being experienced this record is likely to continue or decline unless greater emphasis is placed on road safety. The underlying reasons for the fatality rates are complex. They are influenced by a combination of road network planning and design, the settlement patterns and by behavioural and law enforcement issues. In particular, the road network planning and design concepts have led to a hierarchical road infrastructure system of provision that comprises of many arterial and distributor roads where vehicular speeds are high and, there is limited, or no provision for non-motorised travel outside of the central city areas. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.title An investigation into the reduction of road safety risk in Cape Town through the use of microscopic simulation modelling : a vehicle-pedestrian and infrastructure interaction assessment en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment
dc.publisher.department Department of Civil Engineering en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Jobanputra, R. (2013). <i>An investigation into the reduction of road safety risk in Cape Town through the use of microscopic simulation modelling : a vehicle-pedestrian and infrastructure interaction assessment</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Civil Engineering. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/5037 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Jobanputra, Rahul. <i>"An investigation into the reduction of road safety risk in Cape Town through the use of microscopic simulation modelling : a vehicle-pedestrian and infrastructure interaction assessment."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Civil Engineering, 2013. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/5037 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Jobanputra R. An investigation into the reduction of road safety risk in Cape Town through the use of microscopic simulation modelling : a vehicle-pedestrian and infrastructure interaction assessment. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Civil Engineering, 2013 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/5037 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Jobanputra, Rahul AB - The record of road traffic fatalities in South Africa at around 15,000 per year has continued unabated over the last decade and has led to South African cities consistently featuring at the top of the list of worst known locations for road fatalities around the world. Worryingly, these statistics show that more than half of these fatalities are pedestrians. With the increasing rates of urbanisation and motorisation being experienced this record is likely to continue or decline unless greater emphasis is placed on road safety. The underlying reasons for the fatality rates are complex. They are influenced by a combination of road network planning and design, the settlement patterns and by behavioural and law enforcement issues. In particular, the road network planning and design concepts have led to a hierarchical road infrastructure system of provision that comprises of many arterial and distributor roads where vehicular speeds are high and, there is limited, or no provision for non-motorised travel outside of the central city areas. DA - 2013 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2013 T1 - An investigation into the reduction of road safety risk in Cape Town through the use of microscopic simulation modelling : a vehicle-pedestrian and infrastructure interaction assessment TI - An investigation into the reduction of road safety risk in Cape Town through the use of microscopic simulation modelling : a vehicle-pedestrian and infrastructure interaction assessment UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/5037 ER - en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record