Climatic trends and soil moisture feedbacks over Zimbabwe

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Hewitson, Bruce en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Tadross, Mark en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Mdoka, Marshall Lison en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-07-31T07:59:03Z
dc.date.available 2014-07-31T07:59:03Z
dc.date.issued 2005 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Mdoka, M. 2005. Climatic trends and soil moisture feedbacks over Zimbabwe. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/4783
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 106-118).
dc.description.abstract The research focuses on an objective analysis of austral summer rainfall variability over Zimbabwe as well as characterization of rainfall patterns and frequency analysis over southern Africa region. A statistical analysis of historical trends in climate extreme events is used and lays a foundation of projecting into future climates. A trend analysis done on rainfall patterns attained from SOMs approach compliments the RClimdex statistical approach and strengthens some of the historical trends findings on climate extremes. Thereafter, some exploratory research seeks to explain the trends observed using the land-atmosphere interactions and shows the response of rainfall to anomalous soil moisture conditions during an extreme wet and dry seasons using RegCM3. Finally, some radiation effects results are presented from these soil moisture perturbations experiments. Results show drying out patterns over the region from the historical records analysed. The trend analysis done with SOM arrays revealed a positive trend towards drier conditions and a negative trend for wet conditions. The climate extremes indices analysis complimented these findings as shown in the decrease in total precipitation and an increase in the number of dry spells. This is supported by the circulation patterns showing an increase in frequency of the 500hPa anticyclones and a decrease of low pressures. However, some high altitude stations showed an intensification of precipitation events. This would exacerbate need for proper planning of future water resource management and farming strategies. Soil moisture rainfall feedback mechanisms were not fully explored. However drier conditions experiments showed a stronger response to soil moisture perturbations than in wetter conditions experiments. No consistent response to soil moisture initialisation over southern Africa was found. The altitude does modulate these feedback mechanisms with low-lying areas depicting a stronger response. A better understanding of the observed rainfall patterns, historical climate trends and soil moisture-rainfall feedback mechanisms are essential for improved short-term and seasonal forecasting and will aid the generation of plausible climate change impact predictions. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Environmental and Geographical Science en_ZA
dc.title Climatic trends and soil moisture feedbacks over Zimbabwe en_ZA
dc.type Thesis / Dissertation en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Environmental and Geographical Science en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationname MSc en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record