Domestic Implementation of the Cartgena Protocol in Kenya and South Africa: A comparative analysis

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Mouitui, Charles Otuke en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-07-30T18:02:34Z
dc.date.available 2014-07-30T18:02:34Z
dc.date.issued 2014-07-30
dc.identifier.citation Mouitui, C. 2014-07-30. Domestic Implementation of the Cartgena Protocol in Kenya and South Africa: A comparative analysis. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/4486
dc.description.abstract This comparative study sought to answer the following key research question: to what extent are current and proposed biosafety legislations in Kenya and South Africa consistent with or at variance with key provisions of the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety (the Protocol)? The specific objectives of the study were: to provide an overview of international and African regional approaches to regulation of modern biotechnology; to establish the extent to which such legislation is consistent with or at variance with key provisions of the Protocol, and to assess whether the above legislations are relevant and workable domestically. The study utilized the comparative study methodology. Analysis was guided by a conceptual framework which captured variance and consistency of the Kenyan Biosafety Bill 2005 on one hand and the Genetically Modified Organisms Act together with the Genetically Modified Organisms Amendment Bill 2005 on the other hand as against the Protocol. The study noted that whereas Legal regulation of modern biotechnology is a complex and a sensitive issue globally, translating science into the normative language of law is itself a complex process. The intricacies of legal regulation are exacerbated by the competing and quite often, irreconcilable socio-economic, cultural, ethical and political imperatives that affect biosafety legislation. Biosafety legislation in Africa is at its infancy yet attempts to establish and maintain a balance; grapples with the above competing imperatives thereby raising political questions that leave African states (Kenya and South Africa included) caught up in the genetically modified organisms (GMOs) cold war. In essence, modern biotechnology raises and leaves more questions than can be answered. The findings of this thesis are threefold: the Protocol is itself inadequate; variance significantly outweighs consistency in attempts to comply with the Protocol by Kenya and South Africa, and establishing relevant and workable biosafety legislations in the two countries is problematic and unforeseeable in the near future if not mired in controversy. en_ZA
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.title Domestic Implementation of the Cartgena Protocol in Kenya and South Africa: A comparative analysis en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Law en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Institute of Marine and Environmental Law en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname LLM en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Mouitui, C. O. (2014). <i>Domestic Implementation of the Cartgena Protocol in Kenya and South Africa: A comparative analysis</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Law ,Institute of Marine and Environmental Law. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/4486 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Mouitui, Charles Otuke. <i>"Domestic Implementation of the Cartgena Protocol in Kenya and South Africa: A comparative analysis."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Law ,Institute of Marine and Environmental Law, 2014. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/4486 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Mouitui CO. Domestic Implementation of the Cartgena Protocol in Kenya and South Africa: A comparative analysis. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Law ,Institute of Marine and Environmental Law, 2014 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/4486 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Mouitui, Charles Otuke AB - This comparative study sought to answer the following key research question: to what extent are current and proposed biosafety legislations in Kenya and South Africa consistent with or at variance with key provisions of the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety (the Protocol)? The specific objectives of the study were: to provide an overview of international and African regional approaches to regulation of modern biotechnology; to establish the extent to which such legislation is consistent with or at variance with key provisions of the Protocol, and to assess whether the above legislations are relevant and workable domestically. The study utilized the comparative study methodology. Analysis was guided by a conceptual framework which captured variance and consistency of the Kenyan Biosafety Bill 2005 on one hand and the Genetically Modified Organisms Act together with the Genetically Modified Organisms Amendment Bill 2005 on the other hand as against the Protocol. The study noted that whereas Legal regulation of modern biotechnology is a complex and a sensitive issue globally, translating science into the normative language of law is itself a complex process. The intricacies of legal regulation are exacerbated by the competing and quite often, irreconcilable socio-economic, cultural, ethical and political imperatives that affect biosafety legislation. Biosafety legislation in Africa is at its infancy yet attempts to establish and maintain a balance; grapples with the above competing imperatives thereby raising political questions that leave African states (Kenya and South Africa included) caught up in the genetically modified organisms (GMOs) cold war. In essence, modern biotechnology raises and leaves more questions than can be answered. The findings of this thesis are threefold: the Protocol is itself inadequate; variance significantly outweighs consistency in attempts to comply with the Protocol by Kenya and South Africa, and establishing relevant and workable biosafety legislations in the two countries is problematic and unforeseeable in the near future if not mired in controversy. DA - 2014-07-30 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2014 T1 - Domestic Implementation of the Cartgena Protocol in Kenya and South Africa: A comparative analysis TI - Domestic Implementation of the Cartgena Protocol in Kenya and South Africa: A comparative analysis UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/4486 ER - en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record