Isolation of bacterial strains capable of efficient conversion of n-alkanes into value added products

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Reid, Sharon J en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Mathopa, Byatlela Abel en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-07-30T17:40:04Z
dc.date.available 2014-07-30T17:40:04Z
dc.date.issued 2004 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Mathopa, B. 2004. Isolation of bacterial strains capable of efficient conversion of n-alkanes into value added products. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/4294
dc.description Includes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstract Bacteria that are capable of degrading alkane fractions, C12-C13 and C14-C17, were isolated from oil-contaminated soil collected from the petrochemical company, CALTEX Refineries, South Africa. A total of twenty-three environmental strains were isolated. A preliminary procedure, Nile Blue A straining suggested that twelve of the twenty-three environmental strains might accumulate polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) in their cytoplasm, which is a good candidate for biodegradable plastics. The gene that catalyzes PHA polymerization, phaC, was detected using PCR in some of the environmental strains. The strains of interest were identified and characterized biochemically using various techniques and later sequenced by 16S rONA PCR. The environmental isolate 2 showed a 99 % identity to Pseudomonas aeruginosa BHP7 -6 and was for that reason given a name, Pseudomonas aeruginosa MB2SA. P. aeruginosa MB2SA was shown to possess a 0.5 kb internal fragment corresponding to the phaC gene and capable of degrading the alkane fractions, Cn-CI3 and CI4-CI7, effectively. P. aeruginosa MB2SA was shown to grow optimally in the long alkane fraction, Cw C17, and was further grown in pure alkanes, n-dodecane, n-tetradecane, and hexadecane for comparison. In addition, the strain, P. aeruginosa MB2SA, was grown in an appropriate medium for PHA synthesis and high yields of PHA were observed when both the long alkane fraction, Cw CI7, and pure alkane, hexadecane, were employed as sole carbon sources respectively. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Cell Biology en_ZA
dc.title Isolation of bacterial strains capable of efficient conversion of n-alkanes into value added products en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Molecular and Cell Biology en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MSc en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Mathopa, B. A. (2004). <i>Isolation of bacterial strains capable of efficient conversion of n-alkanes into value added products</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Molecular and Cell Biology. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/4294 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Mathopa, Byatlela Abel. <i>"Isolation of bacterial strains capable of efficient conversion of n-alkanes into value added products."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, 2004. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/4294 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Mathopa BA. Isolation of bacterial strains capable of efficient conversion of n-alkanes into value added products. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, 2004 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/4294 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Mathopa, Byatlela Abel AB - Bacteria that are capable of degrading alkane fractions, C12-C13 and C14-C17, were isolated from oil-contaminated soil collected from the petrochemical company, CALTEX Refineries, South Africa. A total of twenty-three environmental strains were isolated. A preliminary procedure, Nile Blue A straining suggested that twelve of the twenty-three environmental strains might accumulate polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) in their cytoplasm, which is a good candidate for biodegradable plastics. The gene that catalyzes PHA polymerization, phaC, was detected using PCR in some of the environmental strains. The strains of interest were identified and characterized biochemically using various techniques and later sequenced by 16S rONA PCR. The environmental isolate 2 showed a 99 % identity to Pseudomonas aeruginosa BHP7 -6 and was for that reason given a name, Pseudomonas aeruginosa MB2SA. P. aeruginosa MB2SA was shown to possess a 0.5 kb internal fragment corresponding to the phaC gene and capable of degrading the alkane fractions, Cn-CI3 and CI4-CI7, effectively. P. aeruginosa MB2SA was shown to grow optimally in the long alkane fraction, Cw C17, and was further grown in pure alkanes, n-dodecane, n-tetradecane, and hexadecane for comparison. In addition, the strain, P. aeruginosa MB2SA, was grown in an appropriate medium for PHA synthesis and high yields of PHA were observed when both the long alkane fraction, Cw CI7, and pure alkane, hexadecane, were employed as sole carbon sources respectively. DA - 2004 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2004 T1 - Isolation of bacterial strains capable of efficient conversion of n-alkanes into value added products TI - Isolation of bacterial strains capable of efficient conversion of n-alkanes into value added products UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/4294 ER - en_ZA


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