Identification of Bacteroides genes involved in Metronidazole resistance

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Abratt, Valerie Rose en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Casanueva, Ana en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-07-30T17:36:11Z
dc.date.available 2014-07-30T17:36:11Z
dc.date.issued 2004 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Casanueva, A. 2004. Identification of Bacteroides genes involved in Metronidazole resistance. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/4246
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves [123]-141).
dc.description.abstract Bacteroides species are Gram-negative obligate anacrobes that live in the gastrointestinal tract of mammals and are thought to account for approximately 30% of the colonic microbiota. Certain Bacteroides species, such as B. fragilis and to a lesser extent B. thetaiotaomicron, can become opportunistic pathogens and cause severe infection. The antibiotic of choice for treating such infections is metronidazole, a DNA damaging agent. Metronidazole enters the bacterial cell as an inert prodrug, and is activated by cellular reduction into a cytotoxic compound which is thought to cause DNA strand breaks. Certain metronidazole resistant B. fragilis strains have been described, where the drug was not reduced inside the cell due to decreased activity of the metabolic enzymes which are involved in this process. Little is known about the mechanisms involved in repair of metronidazole damage and the potential for resistance. In this study, two difIerent approaches were used to isolate and analyse Bacteroides genes involved in metronidazole resistance, with emphasis on DNA repair genes. These methods were transposon mutagenesis of Bacteroides, and functional complementation of E. coli metronidazole sensitive mutants with genes from B. fragilis. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Cell Biology en_ZA
dc.title Identification of Bacteroides genes involved in Metronidazole resistance en_ZA
dc.type Thesis / Dissertation en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Molecular and Cell Biology en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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