An investigation into the geographical trends in the sectoral composition of the Cape Town economy

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Crankshaw, Owen en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Azwihangwisi, Netshikulwe en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-07-30T04:04:47Z
dc.date.available 2014-07-30T04:04:47Z
dc.date.issued 2010 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Azwihangwisi, N. 2010. An investigation into the geographical trends in the sectoral composition of the Cape Town economy. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/3884
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this research is to examine the geographical trends in the sectoral composition of the city of Cape Town economy between the year 2000 and 2005. The research is informed by related studies and theories that argued Cape Town is developing a post-Fordist spatial order characterised by the development of edge cities and the excluded ghetto. It investigates the extent to which the service sector or producer service is becoming decentralised, and the growth it had experienced compared to the manufacturing sector. We have used sectoral composition data by areas to determine the locations of the service and manufacturing sector, and undoubtedly to test this theory. To achieve our research purpose, data on actual locations of the manufacturing and service companies have been used to determine growth. The spatial trends under debate include 'edge cities' or suburbanisation, the 'excluded ghetto' and 'spatial mismatch'. The implications of the service sector growth in selected geographies are central to the study. Our findings confirmed the growth of the service sector and low decline in the manufacturing sector in the City of Cape Town. Furthermore, the data also show that the immeasurable growth of the service sector has been occurring in the northern and southern suburbs while south-east area has experienced little or no growth. Additionally, it has been observed that although the Cape Town Central Business District (CBD) has experienced a growth in the service sector, it is relatively low compared to the northern and southern suburbs areas. However, the CBD also experienced a slight decline in manufacturing which demonstrate the importance role of this sector in the area. Spatially, the evidence confirmed that it is the services sector situated to the north and south of the CBD that are experiencing increases while the south-east experienced a little growth. The implications of the growth of the service sector in the northern and southern side of the CBD is that of increased spatial and social polarisation as the job market particularly for the working class who are located further away in the impoverished south-east. These spatial trends negatively affect those living in the townships from the rest of society, particularly the working class. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng
dc.subject.other Sociology en_ZA
dc.title An investigation into the geographical trends in the sectoral composition of the Cape Town economy en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Sociology en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Azwihangwisi, N. (2010). <i>An investigation into the geographical trends in the sectoral composition of the Cape Town economy</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Sociology. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/3884 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Azwihangwisi, Netshikulwe. <i>"An investigation into the geographical trends in the sectoral composition of the Cape Town economy."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Sociology, 2010. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/3884 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Azwihangwisi N. An investigation into the geographical trends in the sectoral composition of the Cape Town economy. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Sociology, 2010 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/3884 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Azwihangwisi, Netshikulwe AB - The purpose of this research is to examine the geographical trends in the sectoral composition of the city of Cape Town economy between the year 2000 and 2005. The research is informed by related studies and theories that argued Cape Town is developing a post-Fordist spatial order characterised by the development of edge cities and the excluded ghetto. It investigates the extent to which the service sector or producer service is becoming decentralised, and the growth it had experienced compared to the manufacturing sector. We have used sectoral composition data by areas to determine the locations of the service and manufacturing sector, and undoubtedly to test this theory. To achieve our research purpose, data on actual locations of the manufacturing and service companies have been used to determine growth. The spatial trends under debate include 'edge cities' or suburbanisation, the 'excluded ghetto' and 'spatial mismatch'. The implications of the service sector growth in selected geographies are central to the study. Our findings confirmed the growth of the service sector and low decline in the manufacturing sector in the City of Cape Town. Furthermore, the data also show that the immeasurable growth of the service sector has been occurring in the northern and southern suburbs while south-east area has experienced little or no growth. Additionally, it has been observed that although the Cape Town Central Business District (CBD) has experienced a growth in the service sector, it is relatively low compared to the northern and southern suburbs areas. However, the CBD also experienced a slight decline in manufacturing which demonstrate the importance role of this sector in the area. Spatially, the evidence confirmed that it is the services sector situated to the north and south of the CBD that are experiencing increases while the south-east experienced a little growth. The implications of the growth of the service sector in the northern and southern side of the CBD is that of increased spatial and social polarisation as the job market particularly for the working class who are located further away in the impoverished south-east. These spatial trends negatively affect those living in the townships from the rest of society, particularly the working class. DA - 2010 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2010 T1 - An investigation into the geographical trends in the sectoral composition of the Cape Town economy TI - An investigation into the geographical trends in the sectoral composition of the Cape Town economy UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/3884 ER - en_ZA


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