Competition in Knowledge Ecosystems: A Theory Elaboration Approach Using a Case Study

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Robertson, Jeandri
dc.date.accessioned 2021-06-23T13:15:43Z
dc.date.available 2021-06-23T13:15:43Z
dc.date.issued 2020-09-08
dc.identifier doi: 10.3390/su12187372
dc.identifier.citation Robertson, J. 2020. Competition in Knowledge Ecosystems: A Theory Elaboration Approach Using a Case Study. <i>Sustainability.</i> 12(18):7372. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/33387 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/33387
dc.description.abstract This paper explores how competition works in knowledge ecosystems, using a theory elaboration approach. With little research conducted in this area to date, three strategic streams of thought—resource-advantage theory, dynamic capabilities framework, and adaptive marketing capabilities perspective—are compared as a departing point and a frame of reference regarding the dynamics of competition. The streams of strategic thought all converge around the notion that organizations must constantly renew themselves to adapt and align to a fast-changing marketplace. The characteristics of knowledge ecosystems are conceptualized, whereafter an in-depth case study is presented to empirically assess competition in knowledge ecosystems, focusing on the perspective of a keystone actor. At the ecosystem-level, knowledge ecosystems primarily expose and explore knowledge, indicating that they mostly operate in a pre-competitive state. The time needed and the limited control inherent to knowledge exploration translate into the keystone actor focusing on transient rather than sustainable competitive advantage. Knowledge ecosystems further prove to be central in the coevolution and the growth of other ecosystems through connecting and sharing of the explored knowledge base with other ecosystem actors who, in turn, exploit this knowledge common for commercial purposes and innovation.
dc.source Sustainability
dc.source.uri https://www.mdpi.com/journal/sustainability
dc.title Competition in Knowledge Ecosystems: A Theory Elaboration Approach Using a Case Study
dc.type Journal Article
dc.date.updated 2020-09-25T13:28:19Z
dc.source.journalvolume 12
dc.source.journalissue 18
dc.source.pagination 7372
dc.identifier.apacitation Robertson, J. (2020). Competition in Knowledge Ecosystems: A Theory Elaboration Approach Using a Case Study. <i>Sustainability</i>, 12(18), 7372. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/33387 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Robertson, Jeandri "Competition in Knowledge Ecosystems: A Theory Elaboration Approach Using a Case Study." <i>Sustainability</i> 12, 18. (2020): 7372. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/33387 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Robertson J. Competition in Knowledge Ecosystems: A Theory Elaboration Approach Using a Case Study. Sustainability. 2020;12(18):7372. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/33387. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - AU - Robertson, Jeandri AB - This paper explores how competition works in knowledge ecosystems, using a theory elaboration approach. With little research conducted in this area to date, three strategic streams of thought—resource-advantage theory, dynamic capabilities framework, and adaptive marketing capabilities perspective—are compared as a departing point and a frame of reference regarding the dynamics of competition. The streams of strategic thought all converge around the notion that organizations must constantly renew themselves to adapt and align to a fast-changing marketplace. The characteristics of knowledge ecosystems are conceptualized, whereafter an in-depth case study is presented to empirically assess competition in knowledge ecosystems, focusing on the perspective of a keystone actor. At the ecosystem-level, knowledge ecosystems primarily expose and explore knowledge, indicating that they mostly operate in a pre-competitive state. The time needed and the limited control inherent to knowledge exploration translate into the keystone actor focusing on transient rather than sustainable competitive advantage. Knowledge ecosystems further prove to be central in the coevolution and the growth of other ecosystems through connecting and sharing of the explored knowledge base with other ecosystem actors who, in turn, exploit this knowledge common for commercial purposes and innovation. DA - 2020-09-08 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PY - 2020 T1 - Competition in Knowledge Ecosystems: A Theory Elaboration Approach Using a Case Study TI - Competition in Knowledge Ecosystems: A Theory Elaboration Approach Using a Case Study UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/33387 ER - en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record