The habitus of digital ""strangers"" in higher education

 

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dc.contributor.author Czerniewicz, Laura en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Brown, Cheryl en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-07-29T08:37:00Z
dc.date.available 2014-07-29T08:37:00Z
dc.date.issued 2013 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Czerniewicz, L., Brown, C. 2013. The habitus of digital ""strangers"" in higher education. British Journal of Educational Technology. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 0007-1013 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/3335
dc.description This is the accepted version of the following article: Czerniewicz, L. & Brown, C. 2012. The habitus of digital "strangers" in higher education. British Journal of Educational Technology. 44(1): 44-53., which has been published in final form at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8535.2012.01281.x. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Research into South African students' digitally mediated learning and social practices revealed a subgroup termed ""digital strangers"", students lacking both experience and opportunities, who had barely used a computer and who did not have easy access to technology off campus. Using a Bourdieun framework, this group's technological habitus and access to capital were considered within the field of higher education. There was a focus on two forms of cultural capital: embodied cultural capital, specifically disposition and values; and objectified cultural capital especially computers and cell phones. Social capital—in terms of personal connections and the values of those close to the students—was also considered. The investigation showed a complex technological habitus, with a paucity of access and limited practices in relation to computers, while computers and their associated practices are highly valued within higher education Simultaneously, diverse practices and widespread indications of astute use of cell phones were described even though these remained under-acknowledged both by the students and the institutions in which they operated. Students recognised what the field of higher education valued, but they also used what they had available in order to best operate within the field. The findings point to a contradiction between students' practices and the field of higher education yet also show how student practices with an alternative form of objectified capital are pushing the boundaries of the field itself. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.publisher Wiley en_ZA
dc.rights.uri http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/0007-1013/ en_ZA
dc.source British Journal of Educational Technology en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8535.2012.01281.x
dc.subject.other digital native en_ZA
dc.subject.other digital stranger en_ZA
dc.subject.other habitus en_ZA
dc.subject.other Bourdieu en_ZA
dc.subject.other technology en_ZA
dc.title The habitus of digital ""strangers"" in higher education en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Postprint en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Centre for Higher Education Development en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Czerniewicz, L., & Brown, C. (2013). The habitus of digital ""strangers"" in higher education. <i>British Journal of Educational Technology</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/3335 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Czerniewicz, Laura, and Cheryl Brown "The habitus of digital ""strangers"" in higher education." <i>British Journal of Educational Technology</i> (2013) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/3335 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Czerniewicz L, Brown C. The habitus of digital ""strangers"" in higher education. British Journal of Educational Technology. 2013; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/3335. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Czerniewicz, Laura AU - Brown, Cheryl AB - Research into South African students' digitally mediated learning and social practices revealed a subgroup termed ""digital strangers"", students lacking both experience and opportunities, who had barely used a computer and who did not have easy access to technology off campus. Using a Bourdieun framework, this group's technological habitus and access to capital were considered within the field of higher education. There was a focus on two forms of cultural capital: embodied cultural capital, specifically disposition and values; and objectified cultural capital especially computers and cell phones. Social capital—in terms of personal connections and the values of those close to the students—was also considered. The investigation showed a complex technological habitus, with a paucity of access and limited practices in relation to computers, while computers and their associated practices are highly valued within higher education Simultaneously, diverse practices and widespread indications of astute use of cell phones were described even though these remained under-acknowledged both by the students and the institutions in which they operated. Students recognised what the field of higher education valued, but they also used what they had available in order to best operate within the field. The findings point to a contradiction between students' practices and the field of higher education yet also show how student practices with an alternative form of objectified capital are pushing the boundaries of the field itself. DA - 2013 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - British Journal of Educational Technology LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2013 SM - 0007-1013 T1 - The habitus of digital ""strangers"" in higher education TI - The habitus of digital ""strangers"" in higher education UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/3335 ER - en_ZA


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