Conceptualizing curriculum differentiation in higher education: a sociology of knowledge point of view

 

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dc.contributor.author Shay, Suellen en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-07-29T08:36:58Z
dc.date.available 2014-07-29T08:36:58Z
dc.date.issued 2012 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Shay, S. 2012. Conceptualizing curriculum differentiation in higher education: a sociology of knowledge point of view. British Journal of Sociology of Education. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 1465-3346 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/3331
dc.description This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in British Journal of Sociology of Education on 27 July 2012, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/01425692.2012.722285. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Sociologists of education rooted in social realism have for more than a decade argued that knowledge matters in education, there are different kinds of knowledge, not all forms of knowledge are equal and that these differentiations have significant implications for curriculum. While this argument has made an important contribution to both theoretical and policy debate, the implications for curriculum have not been sufficiently addressed. In other words, a theory of differentiated knowledge has not translated into an adequate theory of differentiated curriculum. Drawing on Basil Bernstein's work on knowledge differentiation and Karl Maton's Legitimation Code Theory, this paper offers an empirically derived emerging framework for conceptualizing differentiated higher education curricula with a particular interest in occupationally and professionally oriented curricula. The framework illuminates the principles underlying curriculum differentiation, thus enabling a richer conversation about epistemological access and progression. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.publisher Taylor & Francis en_ZA
dc.source British Journal of Sociology of Education en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01425692.2012.722285
dc.subject.other curriculum en_ZA
dc.subject.other higher education en_ZA
dc.subject.other knowledge en_ZA
dc.subject.other differentiation en_ZA
dc.subject.other Basil Bernstein en_ZA
dc.subject.other Legitimation Code Theory en_ZA
dc.title Conceptualizing curriculum differentiation in higher education: a sociology of knowledge point of view en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Postprint en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Centre for Higher Education Development en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Shay, S. (2012). Conceptualizing curriculum differentiation in higher education: a sociology of knowledge point of view. <i>British Journal of Sociology of Education</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/3331 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Shay, Suellen "Conceptualizing curriculum differentiation in higher education: a sociology of knowledge point of view." <i>British Journal of Sociology of Education</i> (2012) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/3331 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Shay S. Conceptualizing curriculum differentiation in higher education: a sociology of knowledge point of view. British Journal of Sociology of Education. 2012; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/3331. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Shay, Suellen AB - Sociologists of education rooted in social realism have for more than a decade argued that knowledge matters in education, there are different kinds of knowledge, not all forms of knowledge are equal and that these differentiations have significant implications for curriculum. While this argument has made an important contribution to both theoretical and policy debate, the implications for curriculum have not been sufficiently addressed. In other words, a theory of differentiated knowledge has not translated into an adequate theory of differentiated curriculum. Drawing on Basil Bernstein's work on knowledge differentiation and Karl Maton's Legitimation Code Theory, this paper offers an empirically derived emerging framework for conceptualizing differentiated higher education curricula with a particular interest in occupationally and professionally oriented curricula. The framework illuminates the principles underlying curriculum differentiation, thus enabling a richer conversation about epistemological access and progression. DA - 2012 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - British Journal of Sociology of Education LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2012 SM - 1465-3346 T1 - Conceptualizing curriculum differentiation in higher education: a sociology of knowledge point of view TI - Conceptualizing curriculum differentiation in higher education: a sociology of knowledge point of view UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/3331 ER - en_ZA


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