Transforming space and significance - a study of the constitutional court of South Africa

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Townsend, Stephen S.
dc.contributor.author Rigby, Ursula
dc.date.accessioned 2020-10-14T12:07:28Z
dc.date.available 2020-10-14T12:07:28Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/32304
dc.description.abstract This study examines the process of establishing and building the new South African Constitutional Court as the first intervention in the development of the Constitutional Hill precinct and as part of an endeavour aimed at creating a new national identity. The argument is reliant on the premise that an agency, in this case the judges of the constitutional court, actively seeking out means of transforming space and place and transferring significances in heritage resources, has contributed self-consciously in the process of social transformation. The study is intended to be descriptive of a social reality and explanatory of a special atypical case. Pierre Nora's seminal concept involving lieux de mémoire, their spatial and material potential, and the means by which lieux are formed and retained as lieux (memory objects/vessels/vestiges of heritage) has framed this study. The premise that space and place embodies and transmits concepts of cultural heritage has inspired ongoing and complimentary theories of the ways in which the built environment manifests narratives of power and the role of place in memory. Nora's lieux are social creations often involving built form and it is clear that historically significant built form can be used in social endeavors which contribute to the creation of a society's identity. Research and analysis of the Constitutional Court archive, selected published critique, examination of the artefact itself and by means of interviews with key professional individuals who participated in the programme of the building of the new Constitutional Court, all contribute to an exposure of the process of the endeavour of the judges of the Constitutional Court to establish a “lieux of cultural identity”.
dc.subject Constitutional Court
dc.subject lieu of national identity
dc.subject cultural identity
dc.subject architectural identity
dc.title Transforming space and significance - a study of the constitutional court of South Africa
dc.type Master Thesis
dc.date.updated 2020-10-14T12:06:46Z
dc.language.rfc3066 eng
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment
dc.publisher.department School of Architecture, Planning and Geomatics
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationlevel MPhil
dc.identifier.ris TY - Master Thesis AU - Rigby, Ursula AB - This study examines the process of establishing and building the new South African Constitutional Court as the first intervention in the development of the Constitutional Hill precinct and as part of an endeavour aimed at creating a new national identity. The argument is reliant on the premise that an agency, in this case the judges of the constitutional court, actively seeking out means of transforming space and place and transferring significances in heritage resources, has contributed self-consciously in the process of social transformation. The study is intended to be descriptive of a social reality and explanatory of a special atypical case. Pierre Nora's seminal concept involving lieux de mémoire, their spatial and material potential, and the means by which lieux are formed and retained as lieux (memory objects/vessels/vestiges of heritage) has framed this study. The premise that space and place embodies and transmits concepts of cultural heritage has inspired ongoing and complimentary theories of the ways in which the built environment manifests narratives of power and the role of place in memory. Nora's lieux are social creations often involving built form and it is clear that historically significant built form can be used in social endeavors which contribute to the creation of a society's identity. Research and analysis of the Constitutional Court archive, selected published critique, examination of the artefact itself and by means of interviews with key professional individuals who participated in the programme of the building of the new Constitutional Court, all contribute to an exposure of the process of the endeavour of the judges of the Constitutional Court to establish a “lieux of cultural identity”. DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town KW - Constitutional Court KW - lieu of national identity KW - cultural identity KW - architectural identity LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PY - T1 - Transforming space and significance - a study of the constitutional court of South Africa TI - Transforming space and significance - a study of the constitutional court of South Africa UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/32304 ER - en_ZA


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