Critical analysis of techniques for normalising electromyographic data : from laboratory to clinical research

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Lambert, Mike en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Derman, Wayne en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Tucker, Ross en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Noakes, Tim en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Albertus, Yumna en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-07-28T18:15:58Z
dc.date.available 2014-07-28T18:15:58Z
dc.date.issued 2008 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Albertus, Y. 2008. Critical analysis of techniques for normalising electromyographic data : from laboratory to clinical research. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/3221
dc.description Includes abstract.
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 185-201).
dc.description.abstract Measurements of muscle activity derived from surface EMG electrodes are variable due to both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The intrinsic factors are endogenous in nature (features within the body) and include muscle fiber type, muscle fiber diameter and length, the amount of tissue between muscle and electrode, and depth and location of muscle with respect to the placement of electrodes (24). These biological factors vary between subjects and cannot be controlled. The extrinsic factors are experimental variables which are influenced by the researcher and can be controlled to some extent. Examples of extrinsic factors include the location, area, orientation, shape of electrodes and the distance between electrodes (interelectrode distance). In order to measure biological variation in the EMG signal, which is important in studies where surface EMG is used to gain understanding of physiological regulation, it is important to minimise the variation caused by these factors. This is in part achieved through the appropriate method of normalisation. The isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) has been used as a standardmethod of normalisation for both static and dynamic exercises. However, researchers have recently improved the methods of normalisation by developing alternative techniques for the measurement of EMG during dynamic activities. By using the same type of movement for normalisation as during the trial, experimental errors can be reduced. The appropriate method of normalisation is defined as a method that is capable of showing repeatability, reliability (low intra-subject variation) and sensitivity to changes in EMG amplitude that is due to biological change and not the contribution of experimental factors. The aim of this thesis was to critically analyse alternative methods of EMG normalisation during dynamic exercise. The data should provide possible guidelines to researchers who are planning studies involving measurement of EMG activity during cycling, running and in clinical populations. Furthermore, the thesis aimed to illustrate that decisions regarding the most appropriate method of normalisation should be based on the study design, research question (absolute muscle activity or changes in muscle pattern) and the muscles being investigated. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Human Biology en_ZA
dc.title Critical analysis of techniques for normalising electromyographic data : from laboratory to clinical research en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Human Biology en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Albertus, Y. (2008). <i>Critical analysis of techniques for normalising electromyographic data : from laboratory to clinical research</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Department of Human Biology. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/3221 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Albertus, Yumna. <i>"Critical analysis of techniques for normalising electromyographic data : from laboratory to clinical research."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Department of Human Biology, 2008. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/3221 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Albertus Y. Critical analysis of techniques for normalising electromyographic data : from laboratory to clinical research. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Department of Human Biology, 2008 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/3221 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Albertus, Yumna AB - Measurements of muscle activity derived from surface EMG electrodes are variable due to both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The intrinsic factors are endogenous in nature (features within the body) and include muscle fiber type, muscle fiber diameter and length, the amount of tissue between muscle and electrode, and depth and location of muscle with respect to the placement of electrodes (24). These biological factors vary between subjects and cannot be controlled. The extrinsic factors are experimental variables which are influenced by the researcher and can be controlled to some extent. Examples of extrinsic factors include the location, area, orientation, shape of electrodes and the distance between electrodes (interelectrode distance). In order to measure biological variation in the EMG signal, which is important in studies where surface EMG is used to gain understanding of physiological regulation, it is important to minimise the variation caused by these factors. This is in part achieved through the appropriate method of normalisation. The isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) has been used as a standardmethod of normalisation for both static and dynamic exercises. However, researchers have recently improved the methods of normalisation by developing alternative techniques for the measurement of EMG during dynamic activities. By using the same type of movement for normalisation as during the trial, experimental errors can be reduced. The appropriate method of normalisation is defined as a method that is capable of showing repeatability, reliability (low intra-subject variation) and sensitivity to changes in EMG amplitude that is due to biological change and not the contribution of experimental factors. The aim of this thesis was to critically analyse alternative methods of EMG normalisation during dynamic exercise. The data should provide possible guidelines to researchers who are planning studies involving measurement of EMG activity during cycling, running and in clinical populations. Furthermore, the thesis aimed to illustrate that decisions regarding the most appropriate method of normalisation should be based on the study design, research question (absolute muscle activity or changes in muscle pattern) and the muscles being investigated. DA - 2008 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2008 T1 - Critical analysis of techniques for normalising electromyographic data : from laboratory to clinical research TI - Critical analysis of techniques for normalising electromyographic data : from laboratory to clinical research UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/3221 ER - en_ZA


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